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710 ESPN Seattle Revamps Lineup

Jason Barrett

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710 ESPN Seattle will debut a new and expanded weekday lineup on Monday, July 14.

The changes include a new morning show and two additional hours of local programming as Mike Salk will reunite with Brock Huard on “Brock and Salk”, which will return to 710 ESPN Seattle in a new timeslot, 7-10 a.m. Michael Grey will host “The Michael Grey Show” from 10-noon followed by “Bob and Groz” with Bob Stelton and Dave Grosby, which will still air from noon-3. Danny O’Neil will host “Danny, Dave and Moore” from 3-7 along with Dave Wyman and Jim Moore. “Nightwatch” with Tom Wassell will remain in the 7-9 timeslot.

ESPN Radio’s “Mike and Mike” will air from 3-7 a.m. before giving way to “Brock and Salk”.

Salk and Huard teamed up on “Brock and Salk” from the station’s inception in 2009 until 2012. Salk returned to 710 ESPN Seattle in March as the station’s program director, a role in which he will continue to serve.

“These changes make an already strong lineup even stronger and this is just the beginning,” Salk said. “I’m thrilled with where the station is going and couldn’t be more excited to get behind the mic.”

For more on this story visit MyNorthwest where the story was originally published

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Jeremy Hill Leaving Radio Show For XFL Comeback Attempt

“It’s an opportunity I know is going to go by quick, and I’m probably not going to have that window again.”

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Former LSU running back and current ESPN Baton Rouge host Jeremy Hill is leaving his radio show to attempt a football comeback in the XFL.

Hill has been the host of Hunt & Hill with Hunt Palmer since August of 2021, but announced he is leaving the show to begin working out with the hopes of earning a spot in the third rendition of the XFL, which will begin play in February.

“It’s an opportunity I know is going to go by quick, and I’m probably not going to have that window again,” Hill said. “I’ve got some medical stuff to clear up, but when February rolls around I intend to be on that field again.”

“It’s been a thrill,” Palmer said after Tuesday. “A ton of fun. We are behind him. We can’t thank Jeremy enough for his contributions.”

Guaranty Media owner Gordy Rush, owner of ESPN Baton Rouge, told NOLA.com the company is “in no hurry” to make a decision on who will replace Hill on the show.

A 2nd round draft pick of the Cincinnati Bengals in 2015, Hunt scored 29 touchdowns during his five seasons in the NFL. He last played for the New England Patriots in 2018.

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The Michael Kay Show Ponders Why Broadcasters Don’t Share Their Salaries Like Players

“Because if we were baseball players, we’d all know what we make and we could all go to management and negotiate based off that information. I can’t do that.”

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The salaries of virtually every professional athlete can be found through one avenue or another. And, apparently, if two thirds of The Michael Kay Show had their way, that information would be accessible for broadcasters as well.

While discussing how much MLB players earn for winning the World Series, the topic devolved into how much Kay makes each year.

After telling Don La Greca and Peter Rosenberg players make $516,347 for winning the World Series, the pair hounded Kay about his salary.

“That’s what? Three months salary for you?,” La Greca asked.

“I don’t understand you guys,” Kay said. “You’re very…”

“Very curious about how much you make? Yes,” La Greca interrupted.

“Why are you so curious?,” countered Kay.

“Because if we were baseball players, we’d all know what we make and we could all go to management and negotiate based off that information,” said La Greca. “I can’t do that. What’s different? We’re personalities, we do things publicly, we’re in competition with other radio stations. I don’t understand why you can’t just — right now — tell me how much you’re making. Gerrit Cole can do it. Shohei Ohtani can do it.”

“If Michael would do it, you’d do it right now,” Rosenberg chipped in.

“Without question,” La Greca said.

“Here’s the deal: The great Scott Boras once told me — about representing broadcasters — ‘You guys are your own worst enemy’,” Kay said. “I asked why and he said ‘Because you don’t have a database of what you all make. So, the people that are negotiating with you, they have all the information. They know who makes what. You guys have no idea. Michael, you have no idea what Gary Cohen makes. Gary Cohen has no idea what you make.'”

“Someone needs to stand out, show the cubes — as you like to say — and throw it out there,” concluded La Greca. “Then everybody else will look gutless if they don’t.”

Rosenberg said the downside of sharing their salary on the air is that no matter what the number would be, noting he would be the lowest of the three, listeners “would be sickened” by the number, adding “they don’t think our job is a job, and they’d do it for free”.

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Colin Cowherd Believes ‘Poorly Run’ New York Teams Make Decisions From Media Reactions

“When I used to live out east in Connecticut, you’d hear WFAN, and you’d hear them Met fans complaining, and then they’d go out and make a signing in free agency because their fans were complaining.”

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Many in sports radio believe they could be fantastic front office personnel for the teams they regularly discuss. FOX Sports Radio host Colin Cowherd believes there are front office personnel in New York who take their cues from sports radio hosts and newspaper columnists.

“I think it’s fair to say in the big cities — especially northeast cities, with larger, louder media, Philly, Boston, New York — GM’s, and owners listen to talk radio,” Cowherd said. “They read the columns. The northeast media has more influence than the west coast media.”

Cowherd then pointed to a specific team and specific station for his criticism.

“When I used to live out east in Connecticut, you’d hear WFAN, and you’d hear them Met fans complaining, and then they’d go out and make a signing in free agency because their fans were complaining.”

He then used the example of the Mets signing Jason Bay in 2009 after fans clamored for the team to sign the outfielder. He struggled during his tenure and was released after three seasons.

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