Connect with us
BSM Summit
blank

Sports TV News

MSG Not Bringing Back Cervasio As Knicks Reporter

Jason Barrett

Published

on

When the Knicks open the regular season Wednesday, they will do so without a familiar face courtside — reporter Tina Cervasio.

Cervasio, who had been at MSG since 2008, learned in late June her contract would not be renewed. MSG later hired Rebecca Haarlow for the role. Cervasio’s final assignment for MSG will be Sunday’s Red Bulls game against the Fire.

“I was very upset initially,” she said during the Mets’ off-day World Series workout at Citi Field Friday. “I was shocked. I did not see it coming. My contract was only up in a couple of days when I got the call. So it was very shocking and I was really disappointed.

“I loved my job covering the Knicks and Red Bulls. I was there a long time. Especially with the new staff, I just felt like it was a rough year covering 17 wins, or you could say 65 losses (last season). I felt like I laid really nice groundwork, and I was at the draft. I lost a job that I loved, so I was upset.”

Cervasio would not say who delivered the news, but she said she was told “they were looking to reach a new audience or a different audience, I don’t know. They were looking for a new chemistry.”

MSG issued a statement that said, “MSG would like to thank Tina for her work on Knicks and Red Bulls telecasts and we wish her all the best.”

“I wasn’t told I made a mistake,” she said. “I wasn’t told about an attitude or my work ethic. I’ve always changed the way they wanted me to change. If they wanted me to do something different I always did that … I didn’t expect anything was awry.”

Cervasio said hearing from a variety of people around the NBA made it easier to move on.

“I got an email from a current Knicks player on behalf of the guys that I covered that they were bummed to hear I wouldn’t be there and wishing me the best and praying for me,” she said. “So that really touched me.”

To read the rest of this article visit Newsday where it was originally published

Sports TV News

ESPN Plans 20 Hours of College Football Playoff Selection Coverage

The College Football Playoff teams will be unveiled at 12:15 PM ET, with the rest of the New Year’s Six matchup being revealed at 2:30 PM.

blank

Published

on

blank

ESPN has more than 20 hours of studio coverage planned for the selection of the College Football Playoff.

The College Football Playoff teams will be unveiled at 12:15 PM ET, with the rest of the New Year’s Six matchup being revealed at 2:30 PM. Rece Davis, Kirk Herbstreit, Joey Galloway, Jesse Palmer, and David Pollack will be on the main set as the selections are revealed.

Several other personalities will join the show including analysts Greg McElroy, Robert Griffin III, and Dan Mullen, in addition to Paul Finebaum, Matt Barrie, and Chris Fowler.

ACC Network and SEC Network will also separately produce shows discussing the bowl selections.

Continue Reading

Sports TV News

Chris Fallica Leaving ESPN for FOX

Neither FOX or ESPN would comment on the situation, but in the Awful Announcing report it’s believed that there will be a send-off of some sort for Fallica on Saturday.

Jordan Bondurant

Published

on

blank

A prominent sports betting voice featured on ESPN’s College GameDay will be heading to rival FOX and their Big Noon Kickoff show starting in 2023. According to Awful Announcing, Chris Fallica, affectionately known as “The Bear”, will make his last appearance on GameDay will be this weekend.

Fallica has been with ESPN since 1995. Since 2013, Fallica had been featured on GameDay making betting picks with his patented “Bear’s Board”.

Neither FOX or ESPN would comment on the situation, but in the Awful Announcing report it’s believed that there will be a send-off of some sort for Fallica on Saturday.

Fallica joins Tom Rinaldi as the second former GameDay voice to jump over to FOX and be featured on Big Noon Kickoff.

Both shows have experienced incredible viewership growth this season. For GameDay, there have been several weeks this season that have seen some of the largest audiences in the show’s history.

Continue Reading

Sports TV News

Tim Brando Believes Executives Look For Familiarity, Not Great Voices For Announcers

“Executives are going more for people they think they audience knows from having been in the studio. As opposed to man that’s a great voice, that guy really gets it, and his judgement is fantastic.”

Jordan Bondurant

Published

on

blank

Tim Brando has seen the broadcasting industry has evolved in a lot of ways through the years, but one thing that’s remained constant is how infrequently some of the announcing gigs with major networks open up to younger voices.

That’s mainly because you have veteran talent already occupying those positions with no plans for the immediate future to step aside.

On a recent edition of The Sports Talkers Podcast, FOX Sports broadcaster and host Tim Brando spoke to Stephen Strom about the reality that many broadcasters face.

“Yeah there are a lot more jobs, but there are fewer great jobs,” Brando said. “A lot of guys are getting jobs, but it’s like a dead end.”

But in terms of hiring younger talent for network jobs, he thinks it’s become more about adding faces to broadcast booths rather than voices.

“There’s a tendency I think now in our business to hire more visible and perhaps more popular talent because they’ve been in the studio,” he said. “But they’re not ready to be in the booth. Not everybody can do both well.”

Tim added that there’s a nuance to calling play-by-play versus working studio coverage. Brando said that perhaps it has a lot more to do with young broadcasters bypassing getting their start in radio and going right into TV.

“It seems to me that in some circles anyway in our business, executives are going more for people they think they audience knows from having been in the studio,” he said. “As opposed to man that’s a great voice, that guy really gets it, and his judgement is fantastic.”

Brando did mention some of the younger voices at FOX who have risen to the bigger opportunities in the booth, and how they ultimately worked their way up. He said he’s had the chance to offer advice to a few of them and act as a mentor in a way, because that’s how it was for him breaking into the industry.

“I believe in pouring into the young broadcasters out there, I really do,” he said. “Because Curt Gowdy poured into me. I think there’s a responsibility and a level of accountability for the generation before to help those that are coming up that you really respect.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement blank
Advertisement blank

Barrett Media Writers

Copyright © 2022 Barrett Media.