Connect with us
BSM Summit
blank

Sports TV News

Booger McFarland Staying At ESPN But Doesn’t Know What’s Next

“Marchand wrote that he has been told ESPN has a “prominent studio role” in mind for Booger. The details are still yet to be worked out.”

blank

Published

on

blank

After two years of analyzing Monday Night Football games, Booger McFarland has been moved out of the booth by ESPN. Despite the network very publicly courting replacement candidates, he and play-by-play partner Joe Tessitore were informed last week that the network was moving in a different direction.

McFarland spoke to Andrew Marchand of The New York Post on Thursday and said that he can’t say for sure what his next assignment will be. He does know that he is staying with the network though.

“I have a couple of years left on my contract so I’m not going anywhere,” he said. “So I’m assuming that we get through this pandemic and everything that is going on with that, we will figure it out.”

Marchand wrote that he has been told ESPN has a “prominent studio role” in mind for Booger. The details are still yet to be worked out.

While it is likely that the role would be on one of ESPN’s NFL studio shows, a return to the college football world probably shouldn’t be ruled out. Prior to moving to Monday Night Football, McFarland was a studio analyst on the ESPN-owned SEC Network. He also made regular appearances on College Football Live and ESPN Radio.

As for his time in the Monday Night Football booth, McFarland says he wasn’t a fan of the hype around the debut of the new broadcast team in 2018. Producer Jay Rothman said McFarland would be “football’s Charles Barkley” while comparing play-by-play man Joe Tessitore and fellow analyst Jason Witten to a combination of Brent Musburger and Frank Sinatra and Captain America respectively.

“For me, I always try to approach things and I’ve always learned that the best approach is the humble approach,” McFarland said. “That is the way I go about things. Unfortunately, you can’t control what other people say.”

McFarland was not initially in the booth. During the 2018 season, he was on the sidelines in a mobile cart dubbed the “Boogermobile.” He told Marchand that it was a set up that made it hard to create a rapport with his new partners, because three people cannot develop chemistry or understand each other’s timing “with one of the people 75 yards away.”

While it’s clear he feels like some things were mishandled, McFarland does not have negative feelings about his Monday Night Football experience. The criticism was something he expected and he hopes whoever takes over the booth next season is ready for it.

“Obviously, it is one of the top jobs, if not the top job, in the industry. Overall, regardless of the outcome, it was a very good experience.”

Sports TV News

Kevin Warren: Big Ten Not Closing Door On ESPN Forever

Jordan Bondurant

Published

on

blank

This summer the Big Ten Conference inked new media rights deals with FOX, CBS and NBC that will be worth $7 billion per year over seven years. With the agreement, ESPN will no longer have rights to broadcast conference contests.

But to those saying that the conference will never again be partners with the Worldwide Leader, Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren believes that isn’t the case.

“I’m constantly in a state of perpetual negotiation and relationship building,” Warren said in an interview at the Sports Business Journal Intercollegiate Athletics Forum on Wednesday. “I have incredible respect and admiration for (ESPN president) Jimmy Pitaro and (ESPN programming and original content president) Burke Magnus and (ESPN programming and acquisitions vice president) Nick Dawson. And now with the change from (former Disney CEO) Bob Chapek to Bob Iger, I have great respect for Disney as a company – and what its meant to our country – and for ESPN.”

Despite losing out on the Big Ten, which is shaping up to be one of the nation’s first college super conferences with the addition of USC and UCLA in 2024, ESPN will carry on with America’s other emerging super conference in the SEC, which will add Texas and Oklahoma as members in 2025. ESPN/ABC and the SEC have a 10-year media rights deal in place worth $300 million per season that will go into effect in 2024.

But Warren continued that with things being set in stone for at least the next decade in terms of media rights, there’s no reason to believe that the conference and the network can’t find ways to work together in the future.

“I’m a great believer that life is long, and I will continue to have communications with ESPN,” he said. “I have great respect for them. They’re incredibly important to this institution that we call college athletics. I stay in close contact, and opportunities do present themselves in unique ways.”

Continue Reading

Sports TV News

Netflix CEO: ‘We’re Not Anti-Sports, We’re Just Pro-Profit’

“He characterized expensive media rights as a “loss leader” in the streaming world and noted that Netflix doesn’t view sports as a necessity to grow.”

blank

Published

on

blank

Netflix will not join Apple and Amazon in the rush to gobble up live sports rights. Co-CEO Ted Sarandos addressed the streaming giant’s disinterest at the UBS Global Technology, Media & Telecom Conference on Wednesday.

He characterized expensive media rights as a “loss leader” in the streaming world and noted that Netflix doesn’t view sports as a necessity to grow.

“We’re not anti-sports,” Sarandos said according to Deadline. “We’re just pro-profit. We have yet to figure out how to do it. But I’m very confident we can get twice as big as we are without sports.” 

Questions about the interest the company has in carrying live sports have come up several times in the past. Sarandon made similar comments last year when asked about it.

Reed Hastings, Sarandos’s co-CEO at Netflix, has a slightly different view. In 2021, he indicated that Netflix could be interested in F1 rights someday thanks to the success of its documentary series Drive to Survive, but that would be a special case. Any league interested in doing business with Netflix, he said, would have to allow Netflix to control all of its content.

Ted Sarandos echoed that sentiment in his most recent comments. He said that the company does not see a way to profit by “renting big-league sports.”

Continue Reading

Sports TV News

FOX Sued for Patent Infringement Over NFL Scheduling

“Recentive Analytics filed suit against FOX in a Delaware federal court on November 29 according to Yahoo Sports.”

Jordan Bondurant

Published

on

blank

An analytics company is suing FOX over claims that the network developed a mapping tool using their patented technology to create a season slate of NFL games.

Recentive Analytics filed suit against FOX in a Delaware federal court on November 29 according to Yahoo Sports.

The lawsuit claims FOX used access to Recentive’s predictive analytics tools to develop a resource of their own that would create optimal schedules for its 1 and 4 p.m. NFLwindows.

The company is seeking a declaration that FOX infringed on two of its patents. Recentive is also suing for damages and wants an injunction keeping FOX from using Recentive tech and preventing the network from “selling, offering for sale, marketing or using any internal network and mapping analytics tool for the scheduling and regionalization of events covered by the patents.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

blank

Advertisement blank

Barrett Media Writers

Copyright © 2022 Barrett Media.