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Kirk Minihane Highlights Howard Stern’s Use Of N Word

“According to Minihane, every time Stern denies that he did the things that made him famous, it is a slap in the face to his long time fans.”

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On his podcast this week, Barstool’s Kirk Minihane called out Howard Stern. Over the weekend, social media was abuzz over a segment of The View in which Howard Stern claimed that he had never used the n word on his show. Several people on Twitter pointed out that not only had Stern used the word, he had even performed in black face.

Minihane took it a step further. He played a clip from Stern’s terrestrial radio show in the 90s featuring the King of All Media poking fun at the E! network for bleeping the word from the television version of his show.

During the early days of his show’s national syndication, Stern would put on people and characters that said terrible things in order to goof on how dumb those people sounded according to Minihane. He noted that he wouldn’t do a segment like that now, but noted that “there was a time and place for satire.”

Minihane described himself as a Stern devotee in the 90s. He described Stern as the inspiration for him to broadcast the way he does.

“Literally a light went off in my head,” Minihane said of the first time he heard Stern. “Like I have never heard anything like this in my life.”

Howard Stern’s personality transformation is something Minihane takes personally. According to Minihane, every time Stern denies that he did the things that made him famous, it is a slap in the face to his long time fans.

“Stern is now so pathetic. When I get angry about Stern, keep in mind 19 or 20 year old Kirk was listening to Howard Stern 4 hours a day everyday, buying his books, talking to friends about him. To see what he’s become is depressing.”

That is why Minihane says he wants to highlight Stern’s hypocrisy. In the clip played on the Kirk Minihane Show, Stern uses the n word more than half a dozen times in a five minute span. He also uses racial epithets directed at Asians and Hispanics.

While it should be pointed out that Stern was reading a letter complaining that E! was okay with letting the epithets for Asians and Hispanics air, the network bleeped the n word when airing a bit that was clearly making fun of the Cincinnati Reds notoriously racist former owner Marge Schott.

“I didn’t use the n word. Let’s be very clear,” Stern said in an appearance on The View when one of the hosts mentioned hearing it frequently on his show when she was in college.

“It’s so abhorrently not true and such an easy thing to answer,” Minihane said wondering why Stern wouldn’t note that it was always used on the show to make fun of the person saying it and using it as an opportunity to say that it isn’t something he would do today.

“When I have listened to Howard Stern, in my life, I’m going to estimate he used the n word 5000 times,” Minihane said. “That’s a very soft estimate.”

Minihane said that he believes Howard Stern can deny things he has done that are on tape because he lives “in a bubble” and doesn’t have anyone to challenge him. Minihane also said that Stern has been so used to using his black news anchor and partner Robin Quivers as a “protective cone” for provocative, racially charged material.

Sports Online

Washington Post Reporter Sally Jenkins Details Jerry Jones Reporting to Dan Le Batard

“We just started to research to ask him questions about it and we came across that photo.”

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A report from The Washington Post that featured a photo of Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones witnessing the controversial integration of North Little Rock High School in 1957 caused a stir late last week, and one of the reporters on the project, Sally Jenkins, detailed how it came to be to Dan Le Batard Monday.

“It was part of a larger project,” Jenkins said of the discovery of the photo. “We came across this photo of Jones. It’s at the start of the school year at North Little Rock High School. He’s on the cusp of his 15th birthday and he’s very clearly identifiable in the photo, which ran on the front page of The New York Times in 1957 because Little Rock was undergoing a real crisis of desegregating it’s schools to the the point that (President Dwight D.) Eisenhower had to send the 101st Airborne into Little Rock to quell violence over black kids trying to go to white schools.

“We knew that Jerry Jones had witness — or at least lived through — a tough civil rights era in Little Rock, and we wanted to talk to him about that. We just started to research it to ask him questions about it and we came across that photo.”

The Washington Post debuted a nine-part series entitled “Blackout” that dove into why there are not more minority head coaches in the NFL. They asked every NFL owner for an interview for the project, but Jones was the only one to agree.

Stugotz asked Jenkins if it was fair to judge someone from a photo taken of them while they were a child, referring to some of the media backlish pushed towards Jones because of the photo.

“Of course not,” Jenkins said. “What is fair is to ask him about what he witnessed, ask him what he experienced, ask him how his views may have changed, or if they did change at all, ask him how he has evolved on issues of social justice or racial justice. And the fact is he has evolved, particularly recently. He started out as a real hard-liner on the Colin Kaepernick situation. At one point, Jerry Jones said ‘The Dallas Cowboys will stand for the anthem and tow the line’, and he’s really softened on that.”

She later conceded the answers Jones provided won’t satisfy everyone, and said there are legitimate questions about his positioning in the photograph, noting the Little Rock Six were spit on, and had the n-word shouted at them from those standing on the steps where Jones was located.

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Mike Francesa: George Steinbrenner’s Idea to Put Mike and The Mad Dog On YES Network

“It was George’s idea. So give him credit for it. He wanted Mike and The Mad Dog as part of the CBS Radio contract, and we were.”

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Mike and The Mad Dog is often cited as one of, if not the, best sports radio shows of all time. The show saw an expanded reach with its partnership with the YES Network beginning in 2002. During his podcast Tuesday, Mike Francesa gave all the credit to the simulcast hitting the air on YES Network to the late Yankees owner George Steinbrenner.

“It was George Steinbrenner that came up with the idea of Mike and The Mad Dog being on the YES Network. No one else,” Francesa said.

“They came to us when they were negotiating a new radio deal with him and they said ‘Hey, we need a quick answer on this. Would you guys want to be on the YES Network every day, simulcasting? You know what Imus is doing with MSNBC? We wanna do it with you guys, but we need a very quick answer’.”

Francesa said the show airing on YES Network was a sticking point for the Yankees in negotiations with CBS Radio to continue airing the franchise’s broadcasts.

“Our first deal with them were not for a lot of money. Our later deals with them were for a very significant amount of money. But it was George’s idea. So give him credit for it. He wanted Mike and The Mad Dog as part of the CBS Radio contract, and we were. Our joining the YES Network was part of the CBS Radio contract.”

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Dave Portnoy Reveals Back-And-Forth With New York Times Reporter Who Claimed He ‘Did Not Provide Answers’

“You waited till (sic) your hit piece was done and now you just need to say you gave me a fair chance to speak even though you have no interest in the truth and your article is already written”.

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A story from The New York Times centered around “aging casino company” — Penn National Gaming — and its relationship with “degenerate gambler” — Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy — caught the eye of the face of the online outlet after the claim that he “didn’t provide answers”.

In the story, Steel claims “Penn and Barstool executives did not respond to repeated messages. Mr. Portnoy did not provide answers.” Portnoy brought the receipts to Twitter with a video of all of the correspondence he had with Times writer Emily Steel.

The alleged conversation takes place sporadically from May through November, with Portnoy offering to meet face-to-face with Steel for an interview that is mutually audio and video recorded, which Steel declines. She offered to meet Portnoy in New York for an audio recorded interview, which he declined, saying the interview needed to take place in Miami, because “I’m not running around to accommodate you at the 11th hour.”

He added “You waited till (sic) your hit piece was done and now you just need to say you gave me a fair chance to speak even though you have no interest in the truth and your article is already written”.

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