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Mike Felger Can’t Ignore The Apocalypse

“If you do a sports show in a town with this type of success, a good signal and strong shows all day long on your network and you don’t have ratings? You f***ing suck.”

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If you’re building a Mount Rushmore of current sports radio hosts, Boston’s Mike Felger is on it. But don’t tell him, because that’s the type of generic conversation Felger & Mazz try to avoid on 98.5 The Sports Hub.  

Felger rubs it in that he was right about the Bruins | NBC Sports ...

After nearly two decades with The Boston Herald, Felger was tabbed by program director Mike Thomas to help launch The Sports Hub in 2009, partnering him with Tony Massarotti in afternoon drive. The show quickly made its mark, finding ratings success that is unheard of in sports radio.

Sure, it helps to have an equally unprecedented run of success from Boston’s sports teams, but that will only get you so far. When you’re able to generate numbers that approach a 20 share, the success is about more than just the market.

I spoke to four people in addition to Felger to get an understanding of how he operates as a radio host. Polarizing, opinionated, intelligent, genuine and hardworking were repeated in each of my conversations. His former boss Mike Thomas, current program director Rick Radzik, co-host Tony Massarotti and previous competitor from WEEI Michael Holley each offered insight.

Brandon Contes: Has being a sportswriter and reporter influenced how you create a radio show?

Mike Felger: Absolutely. Especially the kind of print I did which was tabloid journalism. When I worked at The Boston Herald it wasn’t just writing, it was digging up stories, headlines and drama. The way they approached sports writing was definitely conducive to sports radio.

BC: How much of your show is preplanned and organized?

MF: I’m kind of compulsive, but we pretty much program the entire show, all 16 blocks on an email in the morning. Obviously, there are times we need to change on the fly depending on the news, but generally speaking, every segment is on a rundown at the start of the day.

“He’s very smart and focused, he doesn’t miss a thing,” Mazz said. “His senses and awareness are acute and it allows him to pick up on things that not everyone will notice, but it’s invaluable in our business because it facilitates discussion.”

BC: For a journalist, everything goes through multiple filters before it gets to the public, so there’s time to course correct, but in radio, there’s no filter. Once you say it, it’s out there. Was that a difficult adjustment?

MF: Not for me. Sometimes it gets you in trouble, you can go too far and I’ve certainly had those days. You can have a bad take, a bad read on things that doesn’t get edited like you would at a newspaper and you get home at night, think back and say ‘well that wasn’t quite what I meant.’

“Mike’s way better at it than I am,” Mazz added. “He knows exactly how he wants to say something before he says it. Sometimes I don’t, so I’ll have to say it out loud, ‘that didn’t sound right, let me change it’ and that’s my backspace button. But the better way to do it is, say it right the first time and I haven’t perfected that art [Laughs].”

“If you write every day, you don’t necessarily need filters for your opinion,” Holley said. “Your opinion is refined. And if you’re not an idiot, you shouldn’t be concerned about going on the radio and sharing your opinion. Idiots should be afraid. If you go on the radio 20 hours a week, not everything will be perfect, but you can’t worry about being right.”

BC: Do you have a preference, print or radio?

MF: Radio is 10 times easier. It’s not even close. Every day I don’t have to write and report is like I’ve died and gone to heaven. It’s hard, and I really wasn’t good at it. The guys that do it now, developing sources, getting people to tell you something they don’t want to tell you, breaking news – those people are working. What we do on radio is easy compared to that.

BC: What about the need to have such conviction on radio, because again, when you’re writing, you can hide behind the curtain, but in radio the audience can tell if an opinion doesn’t sound genuine.

MF: Say something. Even if it’s wrong, just say something. There’s a lot of nuance with topics, but it’s a better discussion if you’re less nuanced and sports lends itself to that. There’s a scoreboard, you have a winner and a loser, someone makes the right play, someone makes the wrong play, someone makes the right trade or the wrong trade. There’s a reason they have that scoreboard and your commentary should reflect that.

BC: You were part-time with WEEI, then you went to 890 ESPN and it didn’t work. Now you have this opportunity in 2009 with another startup sports station at 98.5. If it didn’t work once, what made you think a new sports station would work the second time?

98.5 WBZ FM — The Sports Hub – H&H Builders Inc.

MF: The second one was far better positioned, but even if it wasn’t, even if it was another crappy AM signal with bad ownership, I probably would’ve taken the show. I have a habit of not turning down work. But this was a no-brainer, it was CBS Radio which was a huge radio company at the time with WFAN and other strong brands. It was an FM signal, they already had the Patriots and the Bruins. 890 didn’t have rights agreements, they had syndicated programming, a small signal and I sucked! It was my first hosting gig and I needed work. But hopefully, I became better in those few years.

“The best thing that happened to Mike was his stint with 890 ESPN,” Radzik said. “He went in there and learned how to do a radio show. He was a solo host, didn’t get a lot of calls, it was a weak signal, but it catapulted him from being a guest, to learning how to manage a show.”

BC: Even knowing how well The Sports Hub was set up, were you surprised how quickly it was able to not only make a dent, but pass an established brand like WEEI?

MF: Yes. I think everyone was. I certainly was. The goal when I took the job was to still have it three years later and get the show renewed. Beyond that, I would’ve said, hopefully within five years we have a real race, but it happened in 12-18 months.

“We captured lightning in a bottle,” Mike Thomas said. “We were the first to FM, the teams were doing really well. This city desperately needed a true second sports competitor, there’s a lot of things that came our way and we know we were very fortunate.”

“We thought our show could work, we wouldn’t have done it otherwise,” Mazz added. “I certainly didn’t expect it to grab hold as quickly and aggressively as it did, but there’s also a big aspect of being in the right place at the right time.”

BC: Does your mentality change at all when you pass EEI and now you’re the hunted, not the hunter?

MF: I think so. When we first started and EEI was so well-established there had to be a measure of counter programming. But I haven’t looked at it that way in a long time. I don’t know if that’s smart or stupid, but for quite awhile now, we do what we do, and it doesn’t matter what happens across the dial.

BC: Is there a risk of complacency? How do you avoid getting stale and letting the competition get bigger in the rearview mirror?

MF: One thing I’ve learned through all of this is, I just don’t think it matters what the other person does. And that’s not specific to EEI, it’s any radio station vs another. What matters is pumping out a good 12-minute segment, going to commercial and then doing another good segment. If the people listening stick through the break and stay for the full 12-minutes, that’s the only thing that matters to me. It’s about what you do to make your show better.

And with complacency, sure – you worry about everything. I certainly don’t think we have it all figured out, we’re going to evolve. So yes, I’m concerned with that. But I’m not concerned with what someone else is doing on the radio.

“Felger is a really hard worker and he’s also tough to copy because he’s authentic,” Holley said. “Some people play a character, but he doesn’t. This is who he is and that’s why he’s so effective. Early on, people thought he was going to get overexposed. But I told them no, because it’s not schtick. Schtick wears out. Predictability wears out. Felger is original and when he goes against the grain, you might not agree, but he can back it up and show his work.”

BC: Is your success more about the show, or more about the market? Because the ratings are unprecedented with shares in the mid-teens. Could Felger and Mazz be successful elsewhere?

Must see: Epic fight beween Michael Felger and Michael Hurley over ...

MF: I do think it’s a show that could be successful in other markets, but the level of success you’re talking about has to do with a lot of factors. It’s the quality of the station, our morning show, our midday show, our management – which even though we’ve changed ownership it’s remained very strong. And it’s the town we’re in. 12 championships since 2000, 19 championship appearances. If you do a sports show in a town with this type of success, a good signal and strong shows all day long on your network and you don’t have ratings? You f***ing suck. Our success is a confluence of factors and not the least of which is Tony, Jim Murray, our producer Jimmy Stewart and everyone on the show.

Holley: “I remember my wife asking how we did, and I would say ‘sweetheart, we finished with a 9 this book and that’s really good.’ I would ask friends in other markets and they would say their best book is a 4 or 5, so I would lead with my 9. But then I’d have to tell them the other guys got a 16! And big picture, 25% of the market is focused on sports which is great, but as a competitor, you say ‘I just wish I could get a win!’ They’re a monster to compete against. I enjoyed competing against 98.5, but it was also humbling.”

BC: Will the Brady-less Patriots impact the station and the Boston sports market?

MF: I’d like to think the fanbase wasn’t just there for Brady and the Super Bowls, that they’re hardcore sports fans through thick and thin. That’s the case with some of the sports in Boston. The Bruins audience is smaller, but those fans stay consistent through the ups and downs. We’re going to find out about the Patriots fan, but I’d like to think we’ve become a football town and they’ll continue to be a massive force.

BC: As a New York fan, I see the Patriots without Brady and who knows what happens to the Red Sox as Major League Baseball attempts suicide. I wouldn’t mind if it’s the beginning of the demise for Boston sports.

MF: [Laughs] The country’s rooting for it. I don’t know if baseball can ever overtake the Patriots again. If the Pats fall off like you hope, I would look for the Celtics and the NBA to step up. It’s a hot product, it caters to young people and I think it has the broad interest that hockey doesn’t. Hockey is more intense and loyal, but the NBA has a lot of casual fans, which is good for business. 

BC: Mike Thomas once called you the most polarizing person in Boston radio, do you agree?

MF: I feel like I’ve gotten wimpier as I’ve gotten older. I can’t rank it, I don’t know if I’m as polarizing as I used to be, but it’s not for me to say. But I think Felger & Mazz has a button pushing quality because my hate mail is still prodigious no matter what I say.

“I would much rather have somebody like Mike Felger where you occasionally need to say ‘we have to dial it back a bit’ than someone you need to push and challenge,” Thomas said. “Mike is self-motivated, he lives for sports radio and is clearly one of the best in the country at it. Maybe in his mind he thinks he’s getting softer, things happen when you turn 50, but I would never categorize Mike Felger as being soft.”

“The biggest thing that’s evolved for him is his reputation as just being a contrarian,” Radzik said. “I think he’s established himself as the number one sports talk show host in the country. You can disagree with him, you may not like his angle, but people have respect for his opinions because the audience has evolved with him.”

BC: Is it that you’ve gotten older or has society in general pushed you to get “wimpy.”

MF: I beat myself up over it, but I’m certainly a little gun shy. Two or three years ago, the Bruins got off to a really bad start. I went on this rant that they were ‘too young, they’re done, they can’t win.’ The team rebounded, made the playoffs and near the end of the season they ran a commercial replaying my rant to rub it in. Jimmy Stewart would say that crawled into my head and neutered me [Laughs]. I’m not really on Twitter or social media, but I feel it’s presence.

BC: What about the fact that social media is there, not just for you, but for everyone, waiting and even rooting for the chance to jump on any slip up.

MF: It’s dangerous. Dangerous times for sure. Maybe that’s another reason to not be polarizing. Maybe you just hit on one. Because there is someone out there trying to get you fired. For anyone writing, broadcasting or speaking in any way, shape or form, you make one mistake and that’s it. It gives you reason to just facilitate because you want to keep your job.

Political correctness: the UK v the US | Financial Times

BC: As society becomes more politically correct, do you think that will deter polarizing personalities from entering the business because of the risk?

MF: Yeah, for sure. That’s really more for news commentators than sports commentators though because you should be able to have a bad sports take and not get fired.

Having a wrong sports take will get you pushback, and people will say you’re stupid, but I’d like to think it’s not going to get you fired the way a bad take on society might.

BC: What about the Roy Halladay comments, did that have an impact?

(When former MLB pitcher Roy Halladay died in a 2017 plane crash, Felger controversially mocked the incident.)

MF: You asked why have I softened a bit? Maybe that day is part of the reason. That was a bad day for me, a big mistake and I would never blame PC culture for that.

I was wrong. I don’t think about it every day, but it’s certainly affected my approach. There’s a line between polarizing and being offensive, it’s a challenge to find that line. You have a day like that where you go over the line and you’ll spend some time making sure you don’t get close again. There’s not many hard parts to this job, but that’s one.

BC: Do you discuss social issues right now with everything going on in the country and complaints about Boston specifically?

MF: We are as sporty a show as you can get, we’re 95% sports. But during this time, it’s crept in a little more. If we did it 5% of the time previously, maybe we do it 10-15% now. And whether I’m pro-left or right, I still get people yelling ‘stick to sports!’ Thank God I don’t have to talk about those topics on a regular basis because people are so bitchy about it. But how can you not hit on some of it right now? You can’t ignore the apocalypse.

BC: As a show that’s 95% sports, how have you done building the full 16-blocks without sports?

MF: It’s been challenging recently, the first month or so was simple because of Brady. Even if the pandemic never hit, most of March and April was going to be 80% Brady’s free agency, Brady going to Tampa, the Patriots next quarterback, the draft and free agency. It turned into 95% of the show, but we had football content until mid-May. Since then, it’s how are leagues going to come back? I’ve found it really interesting, but I acknowledge there’s only so much of that you can do. We definitely need a ballgame.

Bucs' Tom Brady after defying NFLPA advice to end NFL group ...

“Not everyone that comes to the Felger & Mazz show comes for sports,” Radzik said. “They come to be entertained, to laugh and be challenged. There’s an energy level, the show is fast paced, and you have to keep up. But if you have good chemistry you can entertain in different ways.”

BSM Writers

Now Is The Time To Build Your Bench

“There’s a good chance you have a producer, production person, or even a salesperson who has a big enough personality that they can hold your attention.”

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As we crawl towards the Thanksgiving holiday week, many content managers are likely in the middle of figuring out what they’re going to put on the air.

The Power Of Dead Air
Courtesy: Jacobs Media

Since most marquee talent take the entire week off, this can present scheduling headaches.

Some stations (who can) will pick up more syndicated programming. Hey, why not? It’s a cheap, easy solution that’s justified by the fact that business is slow in Q4, and your GM doesn’t want you spending any more money than what you have to.

Other stations will hand the microphones over to whoever happens to be available. This usually ends up being the same array of C and D listers who aren’t that great, but they can cover when needed and usually tend to be affordable.

Both of these decisions, while usually made out of convenience, are terrible mistakes. Quite frankly, it’s one of the many frustrations I have with spoken word media. 

Content Directors should be using the holidays as an excellent opportunity for them to answer a particularly important question: DO I HAVE A BENCH???

One of the most common refrains I hear from other content managers is that they have no talent depth. Everyone constantly is searching for the “next great thing,” yet I find that very few people in management that take the time or the effort to seriously explore that question.

My response to them is always, “Well, how do you know? Have you given anyone in your building a chance yet?”

Often, the answer is sitting in their own backyard, and they don’t even know it.

Years ago, Gregg Giannotti was a producer at WFAN. Then Head of Programming Mark Chernoff gave him a chance to host a show because of how Giannotti sparred off-air with other hosts and producers in the building. Chernoff liked what he heard and gave his producer a shot. Now, he’s hosting mornings on WFAN with Boomer Esiason in what is considered one of the best local sports-talk shows in the country. 

Carrington Harrison was an intern for us at 610 Sports Radio in Kansas City. He worked behind the scenes on Nick Wright’s afternoon show and had a fairly quiet demeanor. It was rare that we ever spoke to each other. On one of his off-days, Nick was talking about Kansas State Football and Carrington called in to talk to him about it. I couldn’t believe what I heard. Not only was his take on the Wildcats enlightening, but he was funny as hell. Soon after, we started working Carrington’s voice into Nick’s show more and eventually made C-Dot a full-time host. He’s been doing afternoons on the station for several years now with different co-hosts and (in my opinion) is one of the best young voices in the format. 

There’s a good chance you have a producer, production person, or even a salesperson who has a big enough personality that they can hold your attention. Why not give them the opportunity to see what they can do? Honestly, what’s the risk of giving someone you think might have potential, a few at-bats to show you what they can do? If your instincts are proven wrong and they aren’t as good as you thought they’d be, all you did is put a bad show on the air during a time when radio listening tends to be down, anyways.

If you go this route, make sure you set them up for success. Take the time to be involved in planning their shows. Don’t leave them out on an island. Give them a producer/sidekick that can keep them from drowning. Be sure to listen and give constructive feedback. Make sure that these people know that you’re not just doing them a favor. Show them that you are just as invested in this opportunity as they are.

Drowning

I understand that most Content Directors are overseeing multiple brands (and in some cases, multiple brands in multiple markets). Honestly though, using the holidays to make a potential investment in your brand’s future is worth the extra time and effort. 

Treat holidays for what they are; a chance to explore your brand’s future. Don’t waste it.

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BSM Writers

Digital Platforms Should Signal The End Of Niche Linear Networks

“Whether it is niche sports or exclusive shows, the streaming platforms have proven to be valuable catch-alls. They haved turned hard-to-sell programming into part of what you get when you are motivated to subscribe by Premier League Soccer or UFC.”

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CBS Sports Network just isn’t built to last. It seems obvious, but it was really hammered home for me on Friday when Jim Rome went off on the network for preempting the simulcast of his radio show for coverage of swimming.

“You idiots are going to preempt this show for swimming?” Rome said. “Stupid.”

You don’t even have to watch the video, right? You can just read the quote and his voice is immediately what you hear in your head.

John Skipper went off on a number of topics during Sports Business Journal’s Media Innovators Conference last week. Some dismissed it as sour grapes. Others said his comments were those of a man that is completely unencumbered by rights deals and corporate interests.

One thing the Meadowlark Media leader said that was dead on was that there are only a few properties in sports television that truly matter.

“Until you can get the NFL, or the SEC, or the NBA on a streaming service, it’s going to be marginal in this country,” Skipper said in a conversation with John Ourand.

He was answering a question about the relevance of streaming services, but the fact is, he could have been talking about any outlet in the world of sports television.

With that being said, it isn’t just CBS Sports Network that isn’t built to last. Comcast got this message last year. That is why NBCSN is about to go dark. Sure, every niche sport has its fan base, but can you build a profitable and powerful brand on swimming, lacrosse and 3-on-3 basketball? You probably can’t.

BSM’s Jeremy Evans recently wrote about life in the metaverse and what it means to sports media. So much happens digitally now. Think about the last time you felt like you HAD to have a physical copy of a movie or album. It always made sense that television networks would get to this place.

Peacock, ESPN+, CBS Sports HQ and Paramount+ all have plenty to offer. Whether it is niche sports or exclusive shows, the streaming platforms have proven to be valuable catch-alls. They haved turned hard-to-sell programming into part of what you get when you are motivated to subscribe by Premier League Soccer or UFC.

CBS Sports Network isn’t the only cable sports network whose existence may be on borrowed time. You know about FS1. Did you know there is an FS2? Did you know beIN Sports still exists? Don’t worry. It seems most major cable operators don’t know it either. The same can be said for networks with names like Eleven Sports, Maverick, and Pursuit.

In fact, when you look at that group of channels, CBS Sports Network is probably in the best shape. It may carry the low end of college football and basketball, but it at least has sports with large, national followings.

Radio simulcasts have always been cheap programming. Once the production costs are recouped, there is a straight-line path to profit. Sports networks on this level will always be interested in carrying radio simulcasts, and that is a good thing. It means better studios and more exposure for the hosts involved. When the suits can have a legitimate debate whether the live sports their network carries will draw as many viewers as the simulcast of a radio show, it may be time to rethink the path forward.

Streaming platforms weren’t built exclusively for niche sports. ESPN+ launched with college football and college basketball at its core. Now that streaming platforms are here to stay though, it should start a conversation and migration.

The cable sports network was never anything more than a prestige play. It was a way to show that a broadcast network was so serious about sports that the few hours it could devote to games would never do. The problem is that ESPN got that memo decades earlier and established a juggernaut.

Even FS1, which has major talent and rights to major college football and basketball and Major League Baseball, is behind the eight ball compared to ESPN. They got a 34 year head start in Bristol! CBS Sports Network is behind FS1 and it has college football, basketball and hockey. It also has the WNBA and the NWSL. Still, it seems like it is on borrowed time. What does that mean for networks that can’t get a league comissioners to take their call?

I like some of the programming on CBS Sports HQ. I think Paramount+ has been a valuable tool this college football season. There would be nothing wrong with CBS shuttering CBS Sports Network. It is just the reality of where we are headed.

CBS aims to grow Sports HQ within its network of streaming channels -  Digiday
Courtesy: CBS

CBS is run by smart people. I have faith they will see the forest thru the trees in sports media and find the right solution before they start losing money. Streaming means consolidation and unfortunately, that means there may not be room for the FS2s, Mavericks, Pursuits, and Eleven Sports of the world. That doesn’t mean the sports those networks carry cannot find a new home. They may even find a home that makes more sense for them and their fans.

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BSM Writers

Can Your Station Create Its Own Holiday?

“Did you see social media on Friday? Did you see any media at all leading up to Friday? Disney created a 24-hour commercial you could not escape.”

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A belated happy Disney+ Day to us all!

Disney+ Day: Kareem Daniel Says “Momentum Building” At Streamer After 2  Years – Deadline

Did you see social media on Friday? Did you see any media at all leading up to Friday? Disney created a 24-hour commercial you could not escape. The best part, from a marketing standpoint, is fans were captivated by it. They either didn’t realize it was a commercial or they just didn’t care.

The execution was masterful. Granted, we Star Wars fans were left wanting a bit, but Disney dropped teasers for series and movies we didn’t know were coming and showed the first footage from one we have been anticipating for more than a year now.

I started thinking how a radio station could do this. How could it go out and create its own holiday? How for one day, can we make our fanbase excited and glued to social media eagerly anticipating announcements about what is coming next?

This is going to take some creativity. Disney+ is a platform full of multiple brands with multiple fanbases buying in. A sports talk station is one brand. It has varying levels of fanbases, but largely, your dedicated audience are the people that not only love sports, but also like your programming enough to be called P1s. Is that enough people to build an event like this around?

Who cares if it is or not! Go for it.

One thing that Disney did masterfully on November 12 is it brought partners into the fold and made them a key part of Disney+ Day. Fortnite announced that Boba Fett was coming to its game. TikTok announced Disney character voice changers would be available on the platform. Disney found the kind of partnerships that could spread its holiday to even the Disney+ Day equivalent of Ebenezer Scrooge.

You can do the same. Surely you have a local brewery as a partner. Can they brew a one day only beer for you? Partner with a restaurant. Can they put your station’s name on the day’s special? Would other partners offer discounts and promotions for celebrating the day? There are a lot of options here.

Now, what are YOU doing on your holiday? Disney has a deep well of franchises. It could squeeze Star Wars, Marvel, Pixar, its own studio and more for content and announcements. Again, you are just one brand, but there is still a lot you can do.

Build the day around announcing your special contributors for the football season. Drop new podcasts and play an extended clip on air. Announce new podcasts, the kind of things that will only be available digitally.

Look at 99.9 The Fan in Raleigh. Joe Ovies and Joe Giglio have created great, multi-episode series that are events for their audience. Like any narrative podcasts, those don’t come together overnight. As long as you have enough audio to build a solid 90 second to 2 minute long preview, you have something worth bringing to the air as part of the celebration.

Do you have a contract you are waiting to expire to make a change in a prime day part? Make your station’s holiday the day that the new talent or show hits the air for the first time. You can do the same for new weekend programs. Whether it is someone new coming to the station or just a new pairing, put them on air for your prime time audience to meet and have your weekday hosts help create some buzz for them.

As for the shows that are on every weekday, you have to make them special that day. Give away a big cash prize. Make the guest list epic – I mean everyone that is on air that day has to be a home run.

The other thing that Disney did so well was work to get all of its divisions involved. Check out this tweet from the Disney Parks account. Every single park around the world lit their iconic building up blue in celebration of the streaming platform’s holiday.

Can you work with other stations in your building? Maybe they won’t give you full on promotion, but between songs, if a DJ brings up a sports topic, would the PD be willing to have them mention that their sister station is celebrating all day? Would a news/talk PD let your talent pop on air to talk sports with their hosts and promote what is happening on your airwaves today?

The answer to these questions could be no. You don’t know if you don’t ask though. Also, if the answer is no, there is nothing wrong with asking for a little backup from your market manager. A station holiday is a major sales initiative after all.

The final piece of this puzzle to take away from Disney is you have to be everywhere. Any local show you air from 6 am until midnight needs to be on location. Fans should have easy access to them. How can they celebrate you if they are not allowed to be where you are?

Use the broadcasts however the sales department sees fit. Take them first to long-established clients to celebrate their loyalty on the station’s holiday. Use them to draw in new clients. Show off what your station can create with its fanbase.

Money has a way of motivating everyone. So, even if your hosts don’t like leaving the studio, these would be remote broadcasts priced at a premium and should have larger-than-usual talent fees attached.

Finally, let’s do something Disney didn’t. I was shocked that a company with this many iconic characters at its disposal and with a CEO that came from the consumer products division, didn’t have a line of merchandise ready to go. Don’t make that same mistake.

Create cool station shirts (not the cheap giveaway crap). Throw the logo on unexpected things like water bottles, bottle openers, facemasks, whatever! Have a merch tent wherever you go. Maybe set up a site to sell it for the day. Make the people come to you to get this stuff.

Twitter is a huge part of promoting what you do. Constantly show off what you are offering and what you have created. That is how Disney sold their event to its most dedicated fans as something not to be missed.

What were we celebrating with Disney+ Day? Nothing. Disney wasn’t even really celebrating anything. It was just a series of commercials wrapped up in fun packaging. Actually, there are a lot of holidays that are just a series of commercials wrapped up in fun packaging.

Valentine Day Digital Ads on Behance

Not every holiday has to celebrate something once in a lifetime. Not every holiday has to even be real. Building your own will take a long lead time, but it is doable. Get sales, promotions and programming in a room and build a plan together. If Disney+ Day taught us anything, it is a valuable way to motivate your fans to spread your message too.

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