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College Football Lives, Higher Academia Dies

“It’s nothing short of abhorrent when universities, trying to rescue revenues in pandemic-shortened football seasons, exploit coronavirus outbreaks by sending student bodies home to protect athletes within campus Bubbles.”

Jay Mariotti

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Why bother with formal names anymore? Let’s just refer to Alabama as the University of Saban, LSU as Coach O State, Clemson as Swinney and Texas A&M as Jimbo Station. Here we’ve thought the purpose of a college campus was to serve America’s future leaders with daily doses of higher education and social direction, but this autumn, don’t be stunned if that precept is crushed by the real objective of university life.

It is, first and foremost, a place of football worship.

And don’t you ever forget it, dadgummit, even if it means protecting Lord Football at the expense of academia: ordering the student body out of classrooms, shifting to online instruction and forcing kids to return home — yeah, scram, all you future scientists, doctors, engineers, teachers — so these sacred players can be isolated from grubby COVID-19 outbreaks and still generate tens of millions in revenues for, say, the University of Mack Brown at Chapel Hill. That school formerly was known as North Carolina, until the administration saw 130 students test positive for the coronavirus last week and seized a sleazy opportunity amid a global health crisis. Hey, why not declare the campus unsafe and send everyone back where they came from?

Except the athletes!

Mack Brown - Wikipedia

“Even with not going to classrooms, that helps us create a better seal around our program and a better bubble,” said Brown, thinking only of his program and the money it produces. “The NBA model is working. They’ve had very few distractions, and what we’re trying to do is make sure our players and our staff understand that we’ve got three months here where we cannot go outside for social reasons or to eat or anything else if we want to have our season.”

This is abhorrent in so many ways, I might need three vomit bags to get through this column and three baths afterward. The NBA, NHL and other professional leagues created restrictive environments for athletes — people who are paid handsome salaries for their labor — in an attempt to complete seasons. College football is trying to create the same Bubble experience for unpaid athletes to play entire seasons, while, just as despicably, shooing away students who’ve paid tuition to learn a life skill, make friends, have a romance, build a bridge to adulthood and earn a full degree so, you know, they stand a chance to survive in a murky America and eventually pay off their college loans.

Be certain that every program in the three Power Five conferences still plotting to play games — Southeastern, Atlantic Coast, Big 12 — is eyeing the Chapel Hill experiment like bank robbers studying a heist. As students were urged to leave campus, athletes have been allowed to stay, with the Tar Heels resuming football practice Monday for a looming Sept. 12 season opener against Syracuse. If the positive momentum from power players and donors is worth absorbing the outcry from parents, faculty and media, you can be damned sure every major football factory with a virus outbreak will banish scholars to Make Football Safe Again. And when top programs pull in more than $100 million annually, if not closer to $200 million, well, they’ll simply clean the mess with a few paper towels — the quicker picker-upper — and ignore the indignation.

It doesn’t require a conspiratorial mind to snuff out the grand scheme. Universities are voicing alarm, as they should be, about virus outbreaks among party-obsessed, irresponsible COVID-iots on campuses in at least three dozen states. But many schools sound faux-shocked about these inevitable cases, obviously with football riches in mind. At Notre Dame, home of legends and fables, the school president, Rev. John I. Jenkins, canceled in-person classes and closed public spaces for two weeks after 336 students tested positive. Then he issued a warning: “If these steps are not successful, we’ll have to send students home as we did last spring.’’

Mike Haynie's advice for leaders: How to create an entrepreneurial culture  - syracuse.com

That way, the Fighting Irish can Bubble-Up the football players, maintain the financial funnel from NBC to Touchdown Jesus and share in their new ACC wealth. Notre Dame has shifted to a 10-game ACC pandemic schedule and is following not only its own money but windfalls produced by Dabo Swinney, whose Clemson cult cash-grabs annual College Football Playoff revenues for all league members and would be favored again to reach any Final Four this season. This explains why the ACC, which plans to launch its schedule two weeks before the SEC and Big 12, is particularly loud at the administrative level about soaring COVID-19 numbers. After a horde of freshmen gathered on the Syracuse campus — remember, on Sept. 12, Dino Babers University battles the University of Mack Brown at Chapel Hill — vice chancellor J. Michael Haynie lashed out at the kids’ lack of social distancing and mask-protocol, saying, “Make no mistake, there is not a single student who gathered on the Quad last night who did not know and understand that it was wrong to do so. … I want you to understand right now and very clearly that we have one shot to make this happen. The world is watching, and they expect you to fail. Prove them wrong. Be better. Be adults.’’ By laying down the law publicly, a university greases the skids for an incremental progression toward the end goal: a campus shutdown and football Bubble.

Of course, no one in power is addressing a disturbing truth: Football players remain vulnerable to virus outbreaks even without the student body on campus. They engage in COVID-19 mosh pits for almost four hours on Saturdays and during practices all week. They travel to games on other campuses and stay in hotels. Oh, and do you think all players suddenly will stop partying responsibly off campus? I agree, send all students home if the transmission rates are out of control.

But send the athletes home, too. Or else you are exploiting them, now more than ever, as servants who are taking monumental health risks that pose potential long-term damage for themselves and their families.

As Chapel Hill basketball player Garrison Brooks tweeted, “So what’s the difference in student athletes and regular students? Are we immune to this virus because we play a sport?”

No. But you are expected to suck it up as a guinea pig at the University of Roy Williams, who also is allowed to resume practice in a sport, college basketball, that should clean up its widespread corruption cesspool before it contemplates a Bubble-based season.

Video: N.C. 'Bathroom Bill' Is Discriminatory

At this rate, with North Carolina State students the latest to depart residence halls, the entire ACC will be Bubble-ized before we know it. While typical revenues cannot be anticipated in abnormal times, the conference schools (and Notre Dame) would be looking at about $32 million each for a full regular schedule and a bit less if they complete the 2020 season. See why they’d all sell their souls to Lord Football? Even a leading American academic institution, Duke, has been suspiciously quiet as it awaits its ACC season opener — at Notre Dame! — on Sept. 12. “The health and safety of our student-athletes is our unconditional priority,” chancellor Randy Woodson said in a statement after N.C. State — er, Dave Doeren State — moved to online classes. “We will continue to hold practices and workouts for our teams under the previously established protocols by our University, Athletics Department and local health officials.” The expectation, the school reiterated, is “to compete this Fall.’’

All of which defies infectious disease experts who say college football should go away, as the Big Ten and Pac-12 have wisely determined. In the defining quote, Dr. Carlos del Rio of Emory University said, “I feel like the Titanic. We have hit the iceberg, and we’re trying to make decisions on what time we should have the band play. What’s important right now is we need to control this virus. Not having fall sports this year, in controlling this virus, would be, to me, the No. 1 priority.’’

Del Rio serves on the NCAA’s advisory panel. Remember, the NCAA does not control a college football machine all but owned and operated by ESPN, which shares its cooperative treasures — along with CBS, Fox Sports and NBC — with five dozen or so campus factories. Almost unanimously painted as a scoundrel by critics including pay-for-play crusader LeBron James, NCAA president Mark Emmert made sense in May when he said, “All of the Division I commissioners and every president that I’ve talked to is in clear agreement: If you don’t have students on campus, you don’t have student-athletes on campus. … So if a school doesn’t reopen, then they’re not going to be playing sports. It’s really that simple.’’ Seems the commissioners and school officials have been struck by amnesia, including Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick, who told Sports Illustrated last spring that football couldn’t be played without a functioning classroom paradigm on campus: “I hate talking in absolutes, but I can’t see doing it. The students have to be on campus.’’ There are no absolutes when big money is at stake. If Jenkins shuts down the campus, I dare him to send home the football players.

Over Knute Rockne’s dead body, he won’t.

Yes, universities need those lucrative football revenues to help stay afloat financially and avoid cutting athletic programs. The more honorable approach: Prioritize the health and safety of the general enrollment instead of sending students home AND pocketing their money, with some schools refusing at this point to lower tuition for online-only classes. At least the students urged to flee the University of Mack Brown will be reimbursed for meals and allowed to void housing contracts. But what about those who live off-campus? And Mack and Roy still expect students to pay the normal fees — $279 for athletics, $400 for student health, $200-plus for campus transportation, $160 for the student union — even when they’re studying at kitchen tables in Gastonia and Asheville.

Dr. Anthony Fauci: 'You don't make the timeline. The virus makes the  timeline.' - CNN Video

The universities will say they’re dutifully obeying the instructions of the Trump-muzzled rock star, Dr. Anthony Fauci, who told CNN, “Unless players are essentially in a bubble — insulated from the community and they are tested nearly every day — it would be very hard to see how football is able to be played this fall. If there is a second wave, which is certainly a possibility and which would be complicated by the predictable flu season, football may not happen this year.”

They are taking him at face value when Fauci, blunt when he has to be, would tell them to stop this Bubble farce at once. Besides, if the NFL is having trouble with authenticating virus tests — at least 10 teams are concerned about a slew of reported false positives from the same New Jersey labs — how can anyone be sure about the efficacy of collegiate testing programs? As del Rio told the Washington Post’s Sally Jenkins, “What are universities about, football or educating students? It seems to me we’re twisting everything to accommodate football instead of doing what we need to do to control the pandemic.”

Pandemic? What’s a pandemic when the University of Manny Diaz, formerly Miami of Florida, hosts Alabama-Birmingham to kick off the season in just 17 days, baby?

BSM Writers

In Defense Of Colin Cowherd

“How did we get to this place where there are sites and Twitter accounts going through The Herd with a fine-toothed comb to create content out of ‘oh my god, look at this!’?”

Demetri Ravanos

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I don’t understand what it is about Colin Cowherd that gets under some people’s skin to the point that they feel everything the guy says is worth being mocked. I don’t always agree with a lot of his opinions myself, but rarely do I hear one of his takes and think I need to build content around how stupid the guy is.

Cowherd has certainly had his share of misses. There were some highlights to his constant harping on Baker Mayfield but personally, I thought the bit got boring quickly and that the host was only shooting about 25% on those segments.

Cowherd has said some objectionable things. I thought Danny O’Neil was dead on in pointing out that the FOX Sports Radio host sounded like LIV Golf’s PR department last month. It doesn’t matter if he claims he used the wrong words or if his language was clunky, he deserved all of the criticism he got in 2015 when he said that baseball couldn’t be that hard of a sport to understand because a third of the league is from the Dominican Republic.

Those missteps and eyebrow-raising moments have never been the majority of his content though. How did we get to this place where there are sites and Twitter accounts going through The Herd with a fine-toothed comb to create content out of “oh my god, look at this!”?

A few years ago, Dan Le Batard said something to the effect of the best thing he can say about Colin Cowherd is that he is never boring and if you are not in this business, you do not get what a compliment that is.

That’s the truth, man. It is so hard to talk into the ether for three hours and keep people engaged, but Cowherd finds a way to do it with consistency.

The creativity that requires is what has created a really strange environment where you have sites trying to pass off pointing and laughing at Cowherd as content. This jumped out to me with a piece that Awful Announcing published on Thursday about Cowherd’s take that Aaron Rodgers needs a wife.

Look, I don’t think every single one of Cowherd’s analogies or societal observations is dead on, but to point this one out as absurd is, frankly, absurd!

This isn’t Cowherd saying that John Wall coming out and doing the Dougie is proof that he is a loser. This isn’t him saying that adults in backward hats look like doofuses (although, to be fair to Colin, where is the lie in that one?).

“Behind every successful man is a strong woman” is a take as old as success itself. It may not be a particularly original observation, but it hardly deserves the scrutiny of a 450-word think piece.

On top of that, he is right about Aaron Rodgers. The guy has zero personality and is merely trying on quirks to hold our attention. Saying that the league MVP would benefit from someone in his life holding a mirror up to him and pointing that out is hardly controversial.

Colin Cowherd is brash. He has strong opinions. He will acknowledge when there is a scoreboard or a record to show that he got a game or record pick wrong, but he will rarely say his opinion about a person or situation is wrong. That can piss people off. I get it.

You know that Twitter account Funhouse? The handle is @BackAftaThis?

It was created to spotlight the truly insane moments Mike Francesa delivered on air. There was a time when the standard was ‘The Sports Pop’e giving the proverbial finger to a recently deceased Stan Lee, falling asleep on air, or vehemently denying that a microphone captured his fart.

Now the feed is turning to “Hey Colin Cowherd doesn’t take phone calls!”. Whatever the motivation is for turning on Cowherd like that, it really shows a dip in the ability to entertain. How is it even content to point out that Colin Cowherd doesn’t indulge in the single most boring part of sports radio?

I will be the first to admit that I am not the world’s biggest fan of The Herd. Solo hosts will almost never be my thing. No matter their energy level, a single person talking for a 10-12 minute stretch feels more like a lecture than entertainment to me. I got scolded enough as a kid by parents and teachers.

School is a good analogy here because that is sort of what this feels like. The self-appointed cool kids identified their target long ago and are going to mock him for anything he does. It doesn’t matter if they carry lunch boxes too, Colin looks like a baby because he has a lunch box.

Colin Cowherd doesn’t need me to defend him. He can point to his FOX paycheck, his followers, or the backing for The Volume as evidence that he is doing something right. I am merely doing what these sites think they are doing when Colin is in their crosshairs – pointing out a lame excuse for content that has no real value.

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BSM Writers

Even After Radio Hall of Fame Honor, Suzyn Waldman Looks Forward

WFAN recently celebrated its 35th anniversary, but that’s not something that Waldman spends too much time reflecting on.

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Yankees radio broadcaster Suzyn Waldman was at Citi Field on July 26th getting ready to broadcast a Subway Series game between the Yankees and Mets. A day earlier, Waldman was elected to the Radio Hall of Fame and sometimes that type of attention can, admittedly, make her feel a bit uncomfortable.

“At first, I was really embarrassed because I’m not good at this,” said Waldman. “I don’t take compliments well and I don’t take awards well. I just don’t. The first time it got to me…that I actually thought it was pretty cool, there were two little boys at Citi Field…

Those two little boys, with photos of Waldman in hand, saw her on the field and asked her a question.

“They asked me to sign “Suzyn Waldman Radio Hall of Fame 2022” and I did,” said Waldman.  “I just smiled and then more little boys asked me to do that.”  

Waldman, along with “Broadway” Bill Lee, Carol Miller, Chris “Mad Dog” Russo, Ellen K, Jeff Smulyan, Lon Helton, Marv Dyson, and Walt “Baby” Love, make up the Class of 2022 for the Radio Hall of Fame and will be inducted at a ceremony on November 1st at the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel in Chicago.

Waldman, born in the Boston suburb of Newton, Massachusetts, was the first voice heard on WFAN in New York when the station launched on July 1st, 1987. She started as an update anchor before becoming a beat reporter for the Yankees and Knicks and the co-host of WFAN’s
mid-day talk show. In the mid 1990s, Waldman did some television play-by-play for Yankees games on WPIX and in 2002 she became the clubhouse reporter for Yankees telecasts when the YES Network launched.

This is Waldman’s 36th season covering the Yankees and her 18th in the radio booth, a run that started in 2005 when she became the first female full-time Major League Baseball broadcaster.

She decided to take a look at the names that are currently in the Hall of Fame, specifically individuals that she will forever be listed next to.

“Some of the W’s are Orson Wells and Walter Winchell…people that changed the industry,” said Waldman. “I get a little embarrassed…I’m not good at this but I’m really happy.”

Waldman has also changed the industry.

She may have smiled when those two little boys asked her to sign those photos, but Waldman can also take a lot of pride in the fact that she has been a trailblazer in the broadcasting business and an inspiration to a lot of young girls who aspire, not only to be sportscasters but those who want to have a career in broadcasting.

Like the young woman who just started working at a New York television station who approached Waldman at the Subway Series and just wanted to meet her.

“She stopped me and was shaking,” said Waldman. “The greatest thing is that all of these young women that are out there.”

Waldman pointed out that there are seven women that she can think of off the top of her head that are currently doing minor league baseball play-by-play and that there have been young female sports writers that have come up to her to share their stories about how she inspired them.

For many years, young boys were inspired to be sportscasters by watching and listening to the likes of Marv Albert, Al Michaels, Vin Scully, Bob Costas, and Joe Buck but now there are female sportscasters, like Waldman, who have broken down barriers and are giving young girls a good reason to follow their dreams.

“When I’ve met them, they’ve said to me I was in my car with my Mom and Dad when I was a very little girl and they were listening to Yankee games and there you were,” said Waldman. “These young women never knew this was something that they couldn’t do because I was there and we’re in the third generation of that now. It’s taken longer than I thought.”

There have certainly been some challenges along the way in terms of women getting opportunities in sports broadcasting.

Waldman thinks back to 1994 when she became the first woman to do a national television baseball broadcast when she did a game for The Baseball Network. With that milestone came a ton of interviews that she had to do with media outlets around the country including Philadelphia.

It was during an interview with a former Philadelphia Eagle on a radio talk show when Waldman received a unique backhanded compliment that she will always remember.

“I’ve listened to you a lot and I don’t like you,” Waldman recalls the former Eagle said. “I don’t like women in sports…I don’t like to listen to you but I was watching the game with my 8-year-old daughter and she was watching and I looked at her and thought this is something she’s never going to know that she cannot do because there you are.”

Throughout her career, Waldman has experienced the highest of highs in broadcasting but has also been on the receiving end of insults and cruel intentions from people who then tend to have a short memory.

And many of these people were co-workers.

“First people laugh at you, then they make your life miserable and then they go ‘oh yeah that’s the way it is’ like it’s always been like that but it’s not always been like this,” said Waldman. 

It hasn’t always been easy for women in broadcasting and as Waldman — along with many others — can attest to nothing is perfect today. But it’s mind-boggling to think about what Waldman had to endure when WFAN went on the air in 1987.

She remembers how badly she was treated by some of her colleagues.

“I think about those first terrible days at ‘FAN,” said Waldman. “I had been in theatre all my life and it was either you get the part or you don’t. They either like you or they don’t.  You don’t have people at your own station backstabbing you and people at your own station changing your tapes to make you look like an idiot.”

There was also this feeling that some players were not all that comfortable with Waldman being in the clubhouse and locker room. That was nothing compared to some of the other nonsense that Waldman had to endure.

“The stuff with players is very overblown,” said Waldman. “It’s much worse when you know that somebody out there is trying to kill you because you have a Boston accent and you’re trying to talk about the New York Yankees. That’s worse and it’s also worse when the people
that you work with don’t talk to you and think that you’re a joke and the people at your own station put you down for years and years and years.”

While all of this was happening, Waldman had one very important person in her corner: Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, who passed away in 2010.

The two had a special relationship and he certainly would have relished the moment when Suzyn was elected to the Hall of Fame.

“I think about George Steinbrenner a lot,” said Waldman. “This is something that when I heard that…I remember thinking George would be so proud because he wanted this since ’88.  I just wish he were here.” 

Waldman certainly endeared herself to “The Boss” with her reporting but she also was the driving force behind the reconciliation of Steinbrenner and Yankees Hall of Fame catcher Yogi Berra. George had fired Yogi as Yankees manager 16 games into the 1985 season and the news was delivered to Berra, not by George, but by Steinbrenner advisor Clyde King.

Yogi vowed never to step foot into Yankee Stadium again, but a grudge that lasted almost 14 years ended in 1999 when Waldman facilitated a reunion between the two at the Yogi Berra Museum in New Jersey.

“I’m hoping that my thank you to him was the George and Yogi thing because I know he wanted that very badly,” said Waldman.

“Whatever I did to prove to him that I was serious about this…this is in ’87 and ’88…In 1988, I remember him saying to me ‘Waldman, one of these days I’m going to make a statement about women in sports.  You’re it and I hope you can take it’ (the criticism). He knew what was coming.  I didn’t know. But there was always George who said ‘if you can take it, you’re going to make it’.”

And made it she did.

And she has outlasted every single person on the original WFAN roster.

“I’m keenly aware that I was the first person they tried to fire and I’m the only one left which I think is hysterical actually that I outlived everybody,” said Waldman.

WFAN recently celebrated its 35th anniversary, but that’s not something that Waldman spends too much time reflecting on.

“I don’t think about it at all because once you start looking back, you’re not going forward,” said Waldman. 

Waldman does think about covering the 1989 World Series between the A’s and Giants and her reporting on the earthquake that was a defining moment in her career. She has always been a great reporter and a storyteller, but that’s not how her WFAN career began. She started as an update anchor and she knew that if she was going to have an impact on how WFAN was going to evolve, it was not going to be reading the news…it was going to be going out in the field and reporting the news.

“I was doing updates which I despised and wasn’t very good at,” said Waldman.

She went to the program director at the time and talked about how WFAN had newspaper writers covering the local teams for the station and that it would be a better idea for her to go out and cover games and press conferences.

“Give me a tape recorder and let me go,” is what Waldman told the program director. “I was the first electronic beat writer.  That’s how that started and they said ‘oh, this works’. The writers knew all of a sudden ‘uh oh she can put something on the air at 2 o’clock in the morning and I can’t’.”  

And the rest is history. Radio Hall of Fame history.

But along the way, there was never that moment where she felt that everything was going to be okay.

Because it can all disappear in a New York minute.

“I’ve never had that moment,” said Waldman. “I see things going backward in a lot of ways for women.  I’m very driven and I’m very aware that it can all be taken away in two seconds if some guy says that’s enough.” 

During her storied career, Waldman has covered five Yankees World Series championships and there’s certainly the hope that they can contend for another title this year. She loves her job and the impact that she continues to make on young girls who now have that dream to be the next Suzyn Waldman.

But, is there something in the business that she still hopes to accomplish?

“This is a big world,” said Waldman. “There’s always something to do. Right now I like this a lot and there’s still more to do. There are more little girls…somewhere there’s a little girl out there who is talking into a tape recorder or whatever they use now and her father is telling her or someone is telling her you can’t do that you’re a little girl. That hasn’t stopped. Somewhere out there there’s somebody that needs to hear a female voice on Yankees radio.”

To steal the spirit of a line from Yankees play-by-play voice John Sterling, Suzyn Waldman’s longtime friend, and broadcast partner…“that’s a Radio Hall of Fame career, Suzyn!”

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BSM Writers

No Winners in Pittsburgh vs Cleveland Radio War of Words

“As talk radio hosts, we often try to hold the moral high ground and if you’re going to hold that position, I can’t help but feel integrity has to outweigh popularity. “

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For nearly 18 months, we’ve known the NFL would eventually have to confront the Deshaun Watson saga in an on-the-field manner, and that day came Monday. After his March trade to the Browns, we also could more than likely deduce another item: Cleveland radio hosts would feel one way, and Pittsburgh hosts would feel another.

If you’re not in tune to the “rivalry” between the two cities, that’s understandable. Both are former industrial cities looking for an identity in a post-industrial Midwest. Each thinks the other is a horrible place to live, with no real reasoning other than “at least we’re not them”. Of course, the folks in Pittsburgh point to six Super Bowl victories as reason for superiority.

I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect when news started to leak that a Watson decision would come down Monday. I was sure, however, that anyone who decided to focus on what the NFL’s decision would mean for Watson and the Browns on the field was in a no-win situation. As a former host on a Cleveland Browns radio affiliate, I always found the situation difficult to talk about. Balancing the very serious allegations with what it means for Watson, the Browns, and the NFL always felt like a tight-rope walk destined for failure.

So I felt for 92.3 The Fan’s Ken Carman and Anthony Lima Monday morning, knowing they were in a delicate spot. They seemed to allude to similar feelings. “You’re putting me in an awkward situation here,” Carman told a caller after that caller chanted “Super Bowl! Super Browns!” moments after the suspension length was announced.

Naturally, 93.7 The Fan’s Andrew Fillipponi happened to turn on the radio just as that call happened. A nearly week-long war of words ensued between the two Audacy-owned stations.

Fillipponi used the opportunity to slam Cleveland callers and used it as justification to say the NFL was clearly in the wrong. Carman and Lima pointed out Fillipponi had tweeted three days earlier about how much love the city of Pittsburgh had for Ben Roethlisberger, a player with past sexual assault allegations in his own right.

Later in the week, the Cleveland duo defended fans from criticism they viewed as unfair from the national media. In response, Dorin Dickerson and Adam Crowley of the Pittsburgh morning show criticized Carman and Lima for taking that stance.

Keeping up?

As an impartial observer, there’s one main takeaway I couldn’t shake. Both sides are wrong. Both sides are right. No one left the week looking good.

Let’s pretend the Pittsburgh Steelers had traded for Deshaun Watson on March 19th, and not the Browns. Can you envision a scenario where Cleveland radio hosts would defend the NFL for the “fairness” of the investigation and disciplinary process if he was only suspended for six games? Of course, you can’t, because that would be preposterous. At the same time, would Fillipponi, Dickerson, and other Pittsburgh hosts be criticizing their fans for wanting Watson’s autograph? Of course, you can’t, because that would be preposterous.

When you’re discussing “my team versus your team” or “my coach versus your coach” etc…, it’s ok to throw ration and logic to the side for the sake of entertaining radio. But when you’re dealing with an incredibly serious matter, in this case, an investigation into whether an NFL quarterback is a serial sexual predator, I don’t believe there’s room to throw ration and logic to the wind. The criticism of Carman and Lima from the Pittsburgh station is fair and frankly warranted. They tried their best, in my opinion, to be sensitive to a topic that warranted it, but fell short.

On the flip side, Carman and Lima are correct. Ben Roethlisberger was credibly accused of sexual assault. Twice. And their criticism of Fillipponi and Steelers fans is valid and frankly warranted.

You will often hear me say “it can be both” because so often today people try to make every situation black and white. In reality, there’s an awful lot of gray in our world. But, in this case, it can’t be both. It can’t be Deshaun Watson, and Browns fans by proxy, are horrible, awful, no good, downright rotten people, and Ben Roethlisberger is a beloved figure.

Pot, meet kettle.

I don’t know what Andrew Fillipponi said about Ben Roethlisberger’s sexual assault allegations in 2010. And if I’m wrong, I’ll be the first to admit it, but I’m guessing he sounded much more like Carman and Lima did this week, rather than the person criticizing hosts in another market for their lack of moral fiber. Judging by the tweet Carman and Lima used to point out Fillipponi’s hypocrisy, I have a hard time believing the Pittsburgh host had strong outrage about the Steelers bringing back the franchise QB.

Real courage comes from saying things your listeners might find unpopular. It’s also where real connections with your listeners are built. At the current time in our hyper-polarized climate, having the ability to say something someone might disagree with is a lost art. But it’s also the key to keeping credibility and building a reputation that you’ll say whatever you truly believe that endears you to your audience.

And in this case, on a day the NFL announced they now employ a player who — in the league’s view — is a serial sexual assaulter, to hear hosts describe a six-game suspension as “reasonable” felt unreasonable. As talk radio hosts, we often try to hold the moral high ground and if you’re going to hold that position, I can’t help but feel integrity has to outweigh popularity.

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