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FOX 17, FOX & Friends Apologize To Nashville Mayor’s Office

“The story originated from Fox 17, a television station in Nashville with Dennis Ferrier reporting the information.”

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Last week, Fox & Friends aired a segment in which there was a claim that the Democratic mayor of Nashville was trying to hide data where it displayed low transmission rates of the coronavirus at bars and restaurants, the Huffington Post reports.

However, this week the Fox News program issued an apology due to sharing news that’s inaccurate, but they weren’t the source for the false report. The story originated from Fox 17, a television station in Nashville with Dennis Ferrier reporting the information. 

CNN’s Oliver Darcy brokedown the Ferrier’s reporting where the Fox 17 reporter misinterpreted what city officials said in emails. As a result, the mayor’s office demanded an apology, which led to Fox 17 removing the story from their website and issued a retraction. 

“In a segment that aired earlier this week, we incorrectly asserted that Mayor Cooper’s office withheld COVID-19 data from the public, which implied that there had been a cover-up,” Fox 17 said. “We want to clarify that we do not believe there was any cover-up, and we apologize for the error and oversight in our reporting.”

The local Fox affiliate wasn’t the only one to apologize. Fox & Friends host Steve Doocy also issued an apology for spreading any false information. 

“We wanted to give you an update on a story we shared last week,” Doocy said. “On Friday, we reported on allegations that the mayor of Nashville had hidden coronavirus numbers. That was according to our local Nashville Fox affiliate. They have since retracted their story. And we now know the mayor’s office apparently did not conceal those numbers and did release them to the public.”

News Television

John Oliver: Subway Stacks Franchisees Against Each Other

Subway franchisees are often individuals or families instead of investment firms, which tend to own McDonald’s locations.

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During the big story on Sunday’s “Last Week Tonight,” host John Oliver focused on the damage caused by Subway’s constant expansion over the past 50 years.

The sandwich chain restaurant is currently the biggest of its kind in the U.S. and, for a time, was the biggest in the world. However, despite the various chains in the country, thousands of locations have closed. 

Furthermore, the restaurant’s franchisees, people, or businesses who own and manage specific locations are suffering. The HBO host stated that unlike McDonalds, which tends to owned by investment firms, Subway franchisees are often individuals or families instead due to their location costs a fraction of what it costs to open a McDonald’s. 

Oliver illustrated that opening a Subway location costs a fraction of what it costs to open a McDonald’s. As a result, Subway franchisees are often individuals or families instead of investment firms, which tend to own McDonald’s locations.

“Your instinct might be to now never go to your local Subway,” Oliver said. “It might have been your instinct before this segment began, and honestly, it remains a good one.”

“But it’s worth remembering that some have spent their life savings on these stores, believing the promise that they could be their own boss, and are now stuck in a business model that was stacked against them from the start.”

Furthermore, the comedian pointed out that Subways bring in far less money than other chain restaurants. The sandwich chain, on average, brings in about half as much as a Jimmy John’s location and about 14 percent of what a McDonald’s makes in a year. 

Oliver also stated that franchisees must pay corporate 12.5 percent of their gross sales instead of the eight percent McDonald’s requires. 

“Come on, Subway,” Oliver said. “You are the one who made your new logo two arrows 69ing each other. The call is coming from inside the house here.”

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News Television

Tucker Carlson: Buffalo Shooting Suspect Is Someone with a “Mental Illness”

Carlson downplayed the idea that the 18-year-old who wrote racist screeds before allegedly murdering 10 people at a Tops supermarket was inspired by “hateful right-wing rhetoric.” Instead shifted to the domestic terrorism bill passed by the House. 

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There’s been plenty of discussions regarding the Buffalo Mass Shooting, which occurred over a week ago. The fallout of the incident has led many news media pundits to be critical of Fox News host Tucker Carlson and accuse him of pushing a White Supremacy narrative. 

Carlson downplayed the idea that the 18-year-old who wrote racist screeds before allegedly murdering 10 people at a Tops supermarket was inspired by “hateful right-wing rhetoric.” Instead shifted to the domestic terrorism bill passed by the House. 

“You should know that their definition of those terms is probably different from yours,” Carlson said, per Mediaite

“So if you were to quote Martin Luther King Jr., whose monument stands on the mall, and say that the U.S. government ought to treat people based on who they are and what they do and not how they look and how they were born, should assess people on the content of their character, not the color of their skin – if that’s your position, you are by definition according to the people you just saw a White supremacist. This is scary.”

Furthermore, the Fox News host also blamed mental illness for playing a role in the shooting and the domestic terrorist bill. 

“So they are continuing to tell you, in the face of all available evidence, that the mass murder you saw over the weekend in Buffalo was inspired by hateful right-wing rhetoric when in fact, that mass murder was committed by someone with diagnosed mental illness that the adults around him apparently ignored,” Carlson added. 

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News Television

Ben Collins Under Fire for Insensitive Post About Buffalo Shooting

Collins sent a lengthy post out claiming the Buffalo shooter had a toothache.

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NBC News senior reporter Ben Collins is under fire for what some on Twitter are calling an insensitive post about the Buffalo super market massacre.

According to Mediate, Collins sent a lengthy post out claiming the Buffalo shooter had a toothache. Collins was referencing the shooter’s Discord page, a social platform that enables users to communicate using voice calls, video calls, text messaging, media, and files in private chats or as part of communities called “servers.” 

“The Buffalo shooter apparently tried to get his bad tooth treated. He went to the dentist, and whatever the dentist tried didn’t fix it,” Collins said. “He didn’t, or couldn’t, go anywhere else. He alluded to insurance problems. But instead of blaming insurance or himself, he blamed the Jews.”

MSNBC analyst Brittany Packnett responded to Collins’ tweet, “The Black people he murdered lived in a food desert. Food apartheid is but one type of “institutional decay” that Black folks live with disproportionately& daily and yet WHITE MEN are the largest domestic terror threat. You’ve lost the point entirely, all while we grieve.“

Payton Gendron of Conklin, New York, was charged with first-degree murder in the killing of 10 people last week.

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