Connect with us
Register for the BSM Summit Now

BSM Writers

Eavesdropping: The Sports Junkies

“The Junkies happen to be four lifelong friends and they also happen to have the ability to captivate a radio audience. That’s the most impressive part of what The Junkies do every morning.”

Published

on

The looming presidential election sent my sports radio listening to Washington D.C. for the month of October.

Expectedly, The Sports Junkies on D.C.’s 106.7 The Fan stayed in their lane every morning. And while that lane for John “Cakes” Auville, Eric “E.B.” Bickel, Jason “Lurch” Bishop and John-Paul “J.P.” Flaim steered clear of politics, it encompassed life-talk, pop culture, comedy and sports on a macro level.

As an outsider, it’s daunting to jump into a new show featuring four hosts because it can take time to catch on. But I appreciated J.P.’s intro every morning, welcoming each host to the show to say hello and subsequently giving me a chance to learn their voices. There were multiple times early on when I was unsure who was speaking, but I could rewind to the open to match names and voices.

My initial reactions were J.P. quarterbacks the quartet, Cakes sounds like Wolfie from The Stern Show, Lurch’s nickname fits, and if you find yourself needing to turn the volume down a tick, it will likely come during a frequent burst of energy from Bickel. Beyond that, four hosts on one show? I expected it to be tough to grasp, but somehow this foursome is perfectly cohesive.

Program directors across the country tout their ear and ability to build a show pairing. But stations have a hard-enough time finding two hosts with the chemistry to become something great, let alone three or even four.

I wouldn’t categorize The Junkies as a modern sports radio show or even a program pointing in the direction of where the industry is headed. Because they aren’t a show built on creativity or well-constructed segments, their success is attributed to their uniquely natural chemistry.

The best way to find four hosts who can sound entertaining and cohesive by fully incorporating each voice, personality and opinion, is to let it happen organically. That’s what happened with The Junkies, who grew up together, went to school together and are seeing some of their friendships near the half-century mark.

Put four radio hosts in a room, each with the drive and ego to succeed, each fighting to make their voice heard and it’s going to sound sloppy. Contrarily, pick a random group of four friends and they’re unlikely to captivate an outside listener while lacking radio prowess.

The Junkies happen to be four lifelong friends and they also happen to have the ability to captivate a radio audience. That’s the most impressive part of what The Junkies do every morning.

J.P., Cakes, Lurch and E.B. didn’t talk much about the election in October, instead providing their audience with an escape, but they certainly didn’t stick to sports either. They’re entertainers first, not sports pundits, which is why their sports-talk content is best described as being on a macro-level. Conversations are more likely to surround whether the Washington Football Team made the right hire in Ron Rivera than it is breaking down advanced analytics for their secondary. You don’t have to be a diehard sports fan to enjoy The Junkies every morning.

106.7 The Fan and WPGC go to war over chicken

Some of their best conversations spurred from mentions of their show sponsor, a heating and cooling company which also dabbles in pest control. Their chatter about E.B.’s smelly mic problem and Lurch’s tummy trouble exemplified natural chemistry and ability to offer unexpected banter. A quick mention of the sponsor could spark 10 minutes of unplanned show content. Hopefully Lurch is healthy, but breaking down his stomach as if it’s a local sports team to determine whether he has diverticulitis or just needs a daily probiotic, definitely was not on their pre-show sheet.

E.B.’s Entertainment Page, which is similar to Peter Rosenberg’s Evening Nightly News on The Michael Kay Show, spans multiple topics and categories. It can trigger discussion about Cardi B and her comparisons to pizza toppings, or leave us jointly disappointed after learning Matthew McConaughey is a bad kisser.

They take a reasonable amount of well-directed callers to include listener participation. But a show with four hosts doesn’t rely on caller segments for an interjection of unique passion and opinion. The Junkies move fast and don’t have many available voids to fill with other voices. Producers Matt Cahill and Matt Valdez are also on-hand, fitting in well with the hosts to provide additional commentary.

As great as the chemistry is with The Junkies, the quickest way to break harmony between four radio hosts is by adding a fifth voice from the outside. The Junkies have a lot of interviews and this is where a lot of their traditional sports talk comes from, but it’s not necessary. This is not a knock on John Feinstein, Kevin McCarthy, J.P. Finlay, Dave Richard, Chris Russell and the large cast of guests who join The Junkies regularly, but it’s too much. With four different hosts featuring four different ideas and opinions on many topics, there’s no room for filler.

Looking back at the interviews I heard last month, I can’t say for sure if each of The Junkies participated in all of them. That means the segments were mostly forgettable. It’s impossible to have a great, inciteful interview with four hosts taking turns asking questions because the back-and-forth gets lost. Interviews don’t need to be replaced completely, but they were largely a lull in what is a predominantly energy and entertainment filled show.

106.7 The Fan was hit by one of their biggest stories in years during the month of October, when afternoon host and former intern on The Junkies, Chad Dukes was fired by parent company Entercom.

The Junkies were most certainly told to make the announcement that Dukes was no longer with the company and move on. But Entercom probably doesn’t give E.B. the green light to make fun of their current stock price, yet he did it anyway. It’s easy for me to criticize The Junkies near silence on the issue as a listener, but I was left wanting more discussion on Dukes’ departure.

This is not limited to 106.7 The Fan, Entercom or even radio, it happens with many news outlets and platforms. They’re willing to discuss scandals involving other entities, but if it involves them, the blinders go up. Despite it being a national news story and despite your audience wanting information on the topic, it’s ignored.

Entercom fired Dukes for offensive language made on his personal podcast and were certainly within their right to do so. But in their statement announcing his exit, the company used the term “racist” for Dukes. A damning categorization, that if true, needs to be proclaimed, but it’s a condemning label that shouldn’t be thrown around lightly.

After the news broke about Dukes, The Junkies still took calls during their Friday show, but there was no mention of the former afternoon host. Callers remained well-directed and on topic as they did throughout the month.

The Sports Junkies | Richmond Sports Radio 910 The Fan

D.C. and The Fan might be looking for a new afternoon show, but they’re lucky to have The Sports Junkies. It’s a friendship listeners want to be part of, thanks to a chemistry that can’t be taught or artificially unearthed.

BSM Writers

Covid Is A Convenient Excuse For Lowering Our Standards

“I am sick of hearing lag and noticeably different levels of soundproofing between two hosts on the same show.”

Published

on

I was probably four hours deep into my all-day football binge on Saturday when I started to think about the overall quality of what I was seeing. This isn’t a column about whether college football is secretly better than the NFL. This is about our industry.

While you may not notice a difference in the presentation on CBS’s top line SEC broadcast or on FOX’s Big Noon Saturday game, it is clear how few resources are being allocated to some of the games further down the networks’ priority list. ESPN doesn’t even send live broadcasters to its Thursday night college football game for instance.

Ohio State football broadcasts go remote amid COVID-19 restrictions
Courtesy: WBNS Radio

Covid-19 was the beginning of this. It forced every business in the broadcast industry to re-evaluate budgets and figure out how to do games when travel and the traditional set up of broadcast booths simply were not on the table.

This isn’t a problem limited to game coverage either. Plenty of hosts still are not back in their radio studio. Plenty of guests on ESPN’s and FS1’s mid day debate shows are still appearing via Skype and Zoom connections. It is as if we have started counting on our audience not expecting quality any more.

I want to be perfectly clear. I get that this pandemic isn’t over. I get that in many cases, networks and stations are trying to avoid overcrowding studios and in some cases, make accommodations for top-level talent that refuse to get vaccinated. “It’s survival mode,” is the answer from corporate.

Do we still need to be in survival mode though? We are 18 months into this pandemic. The majority of Americans are vaccinated. The ones who aren’t are actively making a choice not to do what they need to in order to put on the best possible show they can.

I am sick of hearing lag and noticeably different levels of soundproofing between two hosts on the same show. I am sick of seeing hosts on crystal clear HD cameras in a high tech studio talk to someone on a dirty webcam that can’t be bothered to even put in headphones so they don’t sound like they are shouting down a hallway.

A good example is the late Highly Questionable. I really liked that show when it was done in studio. I liked a lot of the ESPN talent that popped up on the show even after Dan Le Batard left. I couldn’t watch any more of the show than the two minute clips that would show up on Twitter. I didn’t want to see Bomani Jones behind a giant podcast mic. The low res camera that turned Mina Kimes’s house plant into a green blob gave me a headache. The complete disregard for quality made a decent show hard to watch.

Highly Questionable 4/12/21 - Changing History? - YouTube
Courtesy: ESPN

There was a time when the accommodations we made for Covid-19 were totally necessary. Bosses and broadcasters did whatever they had to to get a show or a game on the air. At this point, I am starting to wonder how much of the concessions are necessary and how much are the result of executives that “good enough” is the new standard.

It is totally reasonable to argue that in an age where microphones and editing software are cheap, slick production doesn’t carry the weight it once did. That is true for the podcasters and TikTokers that are creating content in spare bedrooms and home offices. If you’re ESPN or FOX or SirusXM, that slick production is what sells the idea that your content is better than what people can make at home on their own.

It’s soundproof studios, 4K cameras and futuristic graphics packages that make the standard setters in the industry special. Maybe your average Joe Six-Pack can’t put it into words. He just knows that a lot of home-produced content sounds and looks like play time compared to what he sees or hears on a network.

Sure, the anchors are the signature of SportsCenter’s heyday, but it was the stage managers, producers, and other behind-the-scenes staff doing their jobs that really made the show thrive. Those people cost money. The details they took care of may be something 90% of viewers will never notice. They will just know that they are watching a really good show. Those difference makers cannot do their jobs to the best of their abilities if everyone is being piped in from a different FaceTime feed.

In the early days of the Covid-19 pandemic we did whatever we had to. As broadcasters, we made compromises. As an audience, we accepted compromises. We were desperate for familiar entertainment and if Zoom is what it took to get it, that was just fine. There was no cure, no vaccine, things were scary and we were all anxious not knowing how long it would all last.

Anxiety and Depression From COVID-19 – San Diego – Sharp Health News
Courtesy: Nuthawut Somsuk

More than 18 months later, things may not be back to normal, but we are considerably less desperate. There are signs of normalcy in the world. Make the commitment to bring back the standard that won you so many fans in the first place.

Continue Reading

BSM Writers

If Netflix Wants Live Sports, F1 May Be Just The Beginning

“Netflix will shrewdly need to continue to rethink its strategy because its first-mover advantage and long-time industry leading dominance is no longer guaranteed.”

Published

on

In the past, Hollywood dealmakers and stockbrokers wondered whether another studio or streamer would catch Netflix.  Its dominance stemmed from being a first-mover and not having a serious competitor until Amazon and Disney ten or more years after their launch.  However, Netflix would eventually have to compete for content, original and licensed, other platforms that offered less expansive ad-based options, and additional content like live sports or a very popular series or movie premiere.  

Arguably, the pandemic accelerated the move to digital and it allowed competitors to gain subscribers because people were spending more time at home.  More subscribers and additional streaming options for consumers has not caused Netflix to faulter, but it has caused Netflix to rethink its sports strategy.  For years, Netflix was dead set again streaming live sports because of their cost and commercials—Netflix does not have advertisements on its platform currently.  

A sports fan's guide to Netflix, Hulu, YouTube & more after coronavirus  cancels live games | Sporting News
Courtesy: Sporting News/Getty

Netflix’s popular Drive to Survive docuseries about the Formula 1 (or “F1”) racing circuit, which was renewed for a fourth season, and the Michael Jordan/Chicago Bulls The Last Dance represents a golden era and renaissance of sports documentaries.  As much as fans of feature films and television series enjoy learning about actors during and off camera they similarly want to know about sports stars, their coaches, and franchises.  In other words, the business of sports is booming in valuation and behind-the-scenes content.  

Recently, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings stated that the popularity of Drive to Survive has caused the company to rethink its stance on purchasing live sports content.  The broadcast and streaming rights to Formula 1 will become available via ESPN and Sky Sports in 2022 and 2024.  Netflix, will have some competition to secure F1 rights, which will drive up the cost.  It was also reported by Front Office Sports that the Netflix CEO would require a level of exclusivity for sports rights that other platforms do not normally require.  The exclusivity is likely required because Netflix will want to justify the purchase price and to keep-in-line with what Netflix customers expect—exclusive content on the platform.  

With Premier League club Manchester United looking to secure a broadcast deal for selling its rights outside of the traditional league format, it might be the perfect acquisition for Netflix.  An exclusive team vs. an entire league would also be less expensive and more targeted.  One aspect of uncertainty for all streamers is their subscribers overseas, particularly in untapped China.  The international market is far from settled or established.  Netflix also has a large operation in India so possibly cricket via the Indian Premier League (“IPL”) could be a rights purchase to consider.

In 2018, the original content on Netflix only accounted for 8%.  This means that 92% of the content on the platform just a few years ago was all owned (at least partially) by someone else.  That statistic has changed because Disney+, Paramount+, Peacock, HBO Max, Apple+, and many others have since been created and stocked or restocked with content.  Controlling interest in Hulu was even purchased from FOX by Disney.  Disney and Amazon now both rival Netflix in terms of subscribers.  Netflix will shrewdly need to continue to rethink its strategy because its first-mover advantage and long-time industry leading dominance is no longer guaranteed.  

As Comcast-owned NBCUniversal CEO Brian Roberts recently said, purchasing sports rights can be difficult.  Sports rights are expensive.  Exclusive sports rights are even more expensive.  Sports rights only become available every five to ten years.  Networks and streamers are highly competitive to secure those rights with the hope of landing viewers, subscribers, and advertising dollars.  

Will Netflix get into sports rights bidding?  In the past, the digital entertainment giant has been steadfast is its non-sports approach.  However, the market has changed and is flooded with more competitors now.  Netflix has to change to meet its customer and the market needs.  

Formula 1 presents an interesting scenario for Netflix as a buyer and partner.  F1 is a popular league internationally and growing in the United States.  Two new F1 races in Miami, Florida, and Austin, Texas, in addition to season four of the Drive to Survive Netflix series are sure to drive traffic, pun intended, and interest in the racing sport.  

Formula 1: Drive to Survive Season 3 Netflix Docuseries
Courtesy: Netflix

Formula 1 is a sports league that will cost less to purchase streaming rights than a traditional American “Big 4” like the NBA, NFL, or MLB.  Formula 1’s structure is also centered at the top so it would be easier to make an exclusive deal that Netflix seeks.  The remaining questions being, will Netflix pursue Formula 1 sports rights to increase its streaming platform subscribers and compete with others?  Second, will Netflix be the first to offer commercial free live sports programming—for a premium price—or offer in-screen ads and additional during-break inside looks, content, and analysis?  Or will Netflix act more like a traditional broadcaster and offer advertisements to pay down its purchase price?  One will know more after a few laps around the sun.

Continue Reading

BSM Writers

Manningcast Is Best Experienced As A Fan, Not As A Broadcaster

“I still would’ve watched the game had the alternate not been available, but with the Manning breakdown of each play, I was watching an otherwise meaningless game on the edge of my seat.”

Published

on

ESPN

Much has been written on this site already about the ESPN alternative to a traditional Monday Night Football broadcast, the Manningcast. Andy Masur asked if it worked and questioned the network pulling its audience in two different directions. Mark Madden said the concept undoubtedly works, but the content is poor.

Both articles are good reads. Both provide another level of insight from those in the industry and how they view this unique/high-profile concept. Industry views provide solid insight to the success and quality of the show itself, what works – what doesn’t. But if we can’t sit back and take our industry glasses off, and just look at this broadcast as sports fans, I feel we’ll never see it in clear view. 

NFL Week 1 Monday Night Football, Peyton Manning ratings - Sports  Illustrated
Courtesy: ESPN

I’ll admit, for me, it took me no more than 5 minutes of watching week 1’s Ravens vs Raiders game to say “yeah, this isn’t meant for me”. I didn’t like the non-traditional approach of the broadcast, it felt like it lacked the energy of a traditional sportscast. The stadium volume was turned way down, the excitement was more in the conversation they were having with each other, rather than the game itself. It took me out of the moment of the game, rather than allowing me to get sucked in.

Now, in fairness, I kind of went into it with a narrow mind, thinking that would be the case. I am not someone who has the desire to flip around during the College Football Playoff broadcasts and catch the coaches corner or studio chatter, I want the game. 

Bottom line is, I hated the Manningcast when I watched it in Week 1. I even went on the air the next day and trolled members of my audience that were effusive in their praise of it. In the limited sample I provided for myself, I had come to the conclusion that this broadcast wasn’t made for REAL football fans (insert caveman sound effect here) and that only the most casual viewer would want to watch this SNL wanna be of a football broadcast. 

However, week 2, I decided I was going to be more open minded to it. I made it a point to break away from the traditional Packers vs Lions broadcast and watch the Manningcast, no matter how painful. I was completely wrong in my initial opinion.

Was Peyton Manning wearing a helmet and acting a little too zany for my taste in week 1? Yes. Is the guest connection quality well below what we should find acceptable in broadcasting? Yes. But that’s where I made the mistake. I was looking at this broadcast through the eyes of a broadcaster and not as a sports fan. 

Peyton Manning’s charisma jumps off the screen, he is elite at describing what he sees on the field in a way that no one else can. Eli can be a little dry, but he’s low key funny. And they have real chemistry together, as they should. They are family after all.

The thing that hooked me the most was just how invested Peyton was in the plays on the field, he really gets into the game, truly invested in the success and failure of the quarterbacks. There was a moment in week 2 when Jared Goff threw the ball to an empty patch of grass 15 yards down the field and was subsequently called for intentional grounding. You could see Goff yelling at the referee, pleading his case. Peyton surmised, probably accurately, that Goff was telling the ref that the ball was thrown to the right place and that its not his fault the receiver didn’t run the correct route. Peyton then carried on and told stories of when this type of thing would happen to him when he played for Indianapolis and Denver. I was hooked. 

I realized that I was far more invested in week 1 as a stand alone football game, I’m from Baltimore, I have a lot of love for the Ravens. Being invested in the game itself doesn’t lend as much flexibility. As a fan, you to want to hear about anything else but the action on the field. However, when watching two teams that I have no personal interest in, the Manning broadcast took on this new life. It created a level of interest for me as a REAL football fan that I otherwise would not have had. I still would’ve watched the game had the alternate not been available, but with the Manning breakdown of each play, I was watching an otherwise meaningless game on the edge of my seat. I felt like I had a front row view to a football clinic, held by two of the most accomplished players in league history. 

Best of former NFL punter Pat McAfee with Manning bros on 'MNF' | Week 2
Courtesy: ESPN

Personally, I could live without the guests. I am not as entertained by the back and forth with Rob Gronksowski or Pat McAfee as it seems the majority of social media is, but the Manningcast does a brilliant job of bridging the gap between the hardcore football fan and the casual observer. It’s an absolute hit and I’ll be locked in for the next one.   

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2021 Barrett Media.