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Alan Hahn Says National Anthem Can Affect Games

“On Wednesday, ESPN Radio’s Alan Hahn offered an interesting perspective on the playing of the national anthem.”

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After The Athletic reported the Dallas Mavericks ceased playing the national anthem before home games this season, it triggered a predictably spirited discussion. 

Team owner Mark Cuban was met with a firestorm of outrage from people compelled to exclaim their support for the flag, while others defended the decision to respect those who don’t feel properly represented by the anthem. In the wake of the debate, the NBA quickly reinforced their blanket policy that all teams play the national anthem before games.

On Wednesday, ESPN Radio’s Alan Hahn offered an interesting perspective on the playing of the national anthem. Hahn told his co-host Bart Scott that he believes the anthem can impact the outcome of a game. 

While on the Islanders beat in 2003, Hahn remembered The Star-Spangled Banner getting booed by Canadian hockey fans before a game in Montreal. The reaction came in protest of President Bush’s then recent decision to bomb Iraq. Hahn said he became angry and emotional over the booing, just as most Americans would have at the time. 

But the fan reaction gave meaning to what was a meaningless regular season game. Islanders goalie Garth Snow, an American born hockey player was impassioned by the moment and led the Islanders to victory, shutting out the Canadiens. 

Bart Scott makes an equally strong point at the end of the clip, wishing people would be consistent in their love and support of the flag. It took almost two months for outrage to be directed at Cuban over removing the national anthem from Mavericks games, although fans were only in attendance for the first time this week. But if not for The Athletic report, this likely doesn’t become a national story.

I’ve been to many sporting events in my life. I can recount specific plays from almost every one, I can even list the food I ate at many of them. One thing I don’t remember is who sang the national anthem. If there was a game I attended where the national anthem was skipped for any reason, my delayed outrage would be misdirected. 

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Doug Gottlieb On Praise For Pat Beverly: ‘What a Joke!’

“To be in the NBA and say things that are demonstrably false, outright mean, and oh by the way, obtuse to reality and turns people off to your sport.”

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Pat Beverley of the Minnesota Timberwolves may have used his appearances this week on ESPN to set up a potential career in media, but some just simply weren’t impressed.

You can count Doug Gottlieb among them. Gottlieb said Wednesday that Beverley’s takes on Suns guard Chris Paul and words for Matt Barnes regarding James Harden’s contract didn’t do him any favors for the future.

“Pat Beverley, if you’re going to die on a hill, James Harden’s hill is not the one to die on,” Gottlieb said. “In a week in which you have a chance to carve out a potential career for yourself which is as good, or greater than your NBA career. What a joke!”

Gottlieb added that Beverley also lost people completely “acting like the arrogant NBA athlete that so many assume that NBA athletes are.”

“To be in the NBA and say things that are demonstrably false, outright mean, and oh by the way, obtuse to reality and turns people off to your sport,” he said. “Congratulations, hell of a week and you’re only in day two.”

While Beverley may not have Gottlieb singing his praises as an analyst, the T-Wolves journeyman did get the attention of Barstool Sports president Dave Portnoy. Portnoy said if Beverley wanted to do a podcast for the company, he would give him a blank check and hire him no questions asked.

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Mick Hubert to Retire After 33 Years As Voice Of Florida Gators

“This wasn’t the end of a five-year plan. I don’t know if I can explain how I knew, but I knew.”

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After more than three decades and more than 2,500 games called in Gainesville, Mick Hubert is retiring as the voice of the Florida Gators.

Hubert, 68, will call it a career after the Florida baseball team concludes its regular season this weekend.

Hubert, who’s called numerous Gators national championships across multiple sports in his tenure, said he had been thinking about retiring but finally had peace about it to make the decision.

“This wasn’t the end of a five-year plan. I don’t know if I can explain how I knew, but I knew,” he said. “I had been considering this for a little while. I just had to do some praying about it and enjoy every game.”

The longtime broadcaster is a 2019 inductee into the Florida Sports Hall of Fame.

Hubert said he poured his heart and soul into broadcasts and that hopefully fans recognized that.

“I hope they heard the enthusiasm, and the credibility is important to me,” he said. “You need to be factual and credible, but you need to be enthusiastic. That’s what I always felt. I always wanted to take my audience on a roller-coaster ride of emotions. I also wanted to give them enough information so they could paint that picture in their mind.”

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Reporter Tells Kevin & Query About NBA Draft Lottery Security Measures

“By the time you’re watching the production on ESPN for the lottery, we already know.”

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The NBA Draft is coming up towards the end of June, and the top half of the draft order was set this week in the NBA Draft Lottery.

The lottery adds a level of excitement to the mix because you never know if the team with the best odds for the number one pick will actually get it.

But it’s a whole process that actually unfolds well before it airs on ESPN. Pacers reporter Scott Agness of Fieldhouse Files told Kevin Bowen and Jake Query on 107.5 The Fan in Indianapolis what it was like to have access to the lottery.

“By the time you’re watching the production on ESPN for the lottery, we already know,” he said. “It’s already happened. But we’re locked down, sequestered in a room, a ballroom, can’t leave.”

What was even more interesting to Agness was the fact that even people representing lottery teams were under an embargo until the results aired on TV.

“We had all that good info, but the person that won the lottery for instance couldn’t call and celebrate with their people,” Agness said. “None of us in the room could tweet it out because none of us had our devices.”

Agness added that the league had contingency plans in case the lottery drum failed, if the same team had its ping pong ball drawn, and just about every other scenario you could think of. He said he was very impressed with how the NBA did things.

“It was kind of cool to see how well-run everything was in the end,” he said.

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