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Steve Kamer: Getting to Know a Familiar Voice

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After losing his gig as overnight personality at now-defunct radio station Mix 105 in New York, Steve Kamer knew his best route to a lucrative life in broadcasting was going full throttle into a voice-over career.

“The choice was not mine, but the decision was easy to make,” Kamer told BNM.

He was able to parlay 17 years as a “terrible jock” into his on-air reinventing for himself.

By the time Kamer was “transitioning” as air personality, he was already the announcer for NBC’s Today show.

Over the next three decades, Kamer has established himself as a leading sound for many media companies.

Familiar Voice

Despite decades of high-profile voice-over work, with an upbeat and energetic style, there is no resting on any laurels for Kamer, 58, who is still working with coaches to hone and refine his style.

“It’s how you stay at the top of your game and not become a flash in the pan,” Kamer said. “Even though I’m working at what some would consider ‘the peak,’ there’s the next peak.”

He just concluded work for the Olympics on NBC. For two weeks you heard him primarily announcing sponsor billboards. His voice-over work in the sports division goes back to the early 1990s. But under the new management his vocal responsibilities are only needed every two years.

Kamer is also the voice of CBS Radio’s Top of the Hour network newscasts. However, since Entercom took over (and since changed to Audacy), he isn’t allowed to air on the affiliates.

He is the local and network branding voice for Saga Communications’ cluster of news/talk stations.

“In their case, Scott Chase, who’s the group PD, likes the idea of having the network voice doing the local promos,” Kamer said.

Along with the news entities, Kamer “found his voice” in daytime talk shows. His promo list could be part of a Paley Center exhibit. He estimates being heard on 20 programs over the years—Montel Williams, Geraldo, Donahue, Sally Jessy Raphael, Jerry Springer, Ananda Lewis among them and currently Tamron Hall.

Others are familiar with Kamer for joining the final season of Judge Judy after original announcer Jerry Bishop died.

Style aside, Kamer says he separates himself with customer service.

“If somebody commits to you as their announcer, you’re expected to be available when they need you,” Kamer said.

That means if he’s on vacation, Kamer is still expected to produce as necessary for his clients.

“I have a portable travel studio that I set up in the hotel room,” Kamer said.

Early in his voice-over career, he decided to create a home studio and be more accessible to his clients, while also saving himself from the commuting headaches.

“The bad news is everybody who has a home studio can compete for the same work,” he said.

The technical set-up doesn’t feature many bells and whistles. He uses all Apple products, including a Mac mini. But there is no separate announcer booth for Kamer.

“The whole room is padded and the sound is great,” he said.

In 2018, Kamer left the studio to surprise Steve Harvey, who never met his announcer, as he was interviewed from the audience about being single and taking care of his 92-year-old mother.

Beginnings

For Kamer, who hails from South Jersey, it started in radio at just 14 years old. His upbringing helped align the stars for his microphone mentality. At an early age, Kamer would sample stations from New York City and Philadelphia during the day and other markets at night.

“I always was intrigued by listening to voices on radio, and ultimately on television.” Kamer said.

The broadcasting bug bit as a youngster as his parents took him to several game show tapings in Manhattan and he was mesmerized by the announcers, especially watching the legendary Don Pardo do the audience warm-up for the original Jeopardy! on NBC.

The love for the industry was there and so was the voice.

“Even at a young age, I had a voice that stood out,” he said. “It didn’t have a New Jersey accent, which I think was probably a plus.”

During the Olympics, Kamer had to block out time each morning to record the latest scripts for producers in Stamford, CT. There was overall a lead time of two days from producing the audio to airing.   

“They want to call or page, and have you immediately drop what you’re doing, get on the microphone and record with them,” Kamer said. “I always put my best voice forward.”

Breaking news could also force Kamer to quickly rerecord a new promo for shows like Tamron Hall even just hours before airtime.

Many weekdays Kamer can get in his recording booth at 8 a.m. and not finish until midnight.

To New York area sports fans, Kamer is the voice of the YES Network with his famous “Only on YES!” delivery. He’s been with the Yankees’ broadcast home since its inception in 2002.

“TV pays the bills, but radio is very exciting,” Kamer said. “There’s just no way around it. It’s immediate. I like to record something, hear it on the air and know that I’m a part of the overall station.”

He’s recently got a three-year renewal to remain as the voice of WGN Radio in Chicago.

“People commit for long periods of time because they don’t want you to go somewhere else in the market,” he said.

So, the value of voice affords him “some sense of stability in a job that’s considered a freelance job.”

Even more so than traditional broadcasting, the voice-over business is highly competitive.

“There are a lot of great voice-over announcers, but there’s one Steve Kamer,” he said proudly. “That’s the mantel I claim. I play in my own sandbox.”

The next generation of voice-over artists ask him often how they can also become successful. He said a good voice isn’t enough. It can’t be a hobby; you need a coach and demo tape that stands out and shows your strongest assets.

“You can’t come across as desperate,” he said.

While every gig is important and treated with the same care by Kamer, he delineates the work, for example: “When I’m doing a radio station in Atlantic City, Des Moines, or Nashville, I put on a voice that’s reflective of wearing a pair of jeans or khakis,” Kamer said. “When I’m doing the Olympics, I put on my tuxedo voice.”

Typically, he works independently without direction, a process he considers “more efficient.”

“You might listen after a while and say, ‘They all sound the same.’ And maybe they do. But I try to give each one a little bit of its own uniqueness.”

Kamer has to “own the copy” by fact-checking and, obviously, confirming any confusing pronunciations.

CNN viewers were likely hearing him on promos in the run up to the cable network’s airing of the NYC Homecoming Concert on August 21.

Always Growing

However, his popularity has not translated into commercial work. 

“[They] have not been an area that I’ve had a lot of success in,” Kamer admitted.

Another part of voice-overs that eludes Kamer are movie trailers and network prime-time promos.

“That’s a hard one. That really borders on being a good actor,” Kamer said. “Although the jobs that I do require some acting, those movie trailers and network promos require all acting.”

Those artists are storytellers and “the minute I put on the headphones and read a script, I’m not as good a storyteller as many of the people who are currently booking them,” he confessed.  “I haven’t given up on those things, but those don’t come as easily for me. I would say that a lot of the people who do movie trailers and network promos can’t easily transition to what I do.”

He was able to separate himself from those high-profile movie announcers who missed out on work for months during the pandemic. Kamer, though, has been busy throughout for his radio and TV gigs, including Inside Edition.

“The style changed in many cases. I couldn’t be as hard hitting and abrasive in some reads. I had to pull it back and reflect what’s going on in the world, even in subtle differences,” Kamer said.  

You’ll also find him doing narration work for the Smithsonian Channel, but “you really have to stay committed and interested in the subject matter.”

Despite his many assignments over the years, few people outside of the industry connect the dots to Kamer’s work.

“My voice is a celebrity. I’m not. Only my voice is famous.” Kamer said. “It’s exciting to be out and hear my voice on the TV or radio somewhere. But I like the anonymity of being in a room and not being known as the announcer guy.”

That cache as a voice on marquee projects has helped bring more big-name jobs.

Kamer is not worrying about spreading his voice too thin.

“If someone recognizes the voice, that’s fine,” he said. “But we want the voice to sort of be in the background and the message to be in the foreground.”

Sometimes his voice literally is spread too thin with a cold, or worse, laryngitis. Instead of it being a deal breaker, Kamer has been able to use the huskiness to his advantage.

“I’ve booked the job and then I can’t duplicate it when my voice gets better,” Kamer laughed.  

Upon a visit to Atlantic City you might hear Kamer welcoming guests to the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, where “they blast my voice with announcements constantly.”

Plus, using his fondness for transportation and his Jersey roots, he “greets” PATH train riders with next stop alert and the famous “please stand clear of the closing doors.”

He also enjoys being heard on a handful of New Jersey radio stations.

“It’s just really cool to be on local stations that you grew up listening to,” Kamer said.

When it comes to picking projects, Kamer needs to feel passionate about the topic.

“It’s not driven by money,” he admitted.

Despite that, Kamer was intrigued by the chance to earn his annual radio salary in a month of voice-over work.

That said, his rates are based on various factors, including market size and amount of copy per month.

“A local radio station isn’t going to pay the same as NBC Sports. That would be ridiculous,” Kamer said. 

With a great career that shows no sign of slowing, Kamer occasionally wonders “what if”? 

“Had radio continued to embrace me as a jock, I might still be doing it today,” he said.

BNM Writers

WGN’s John Williams Was Determined To Get Into Broadcasting at Any Level

Sending out tapes every six months was a part-time job for Williams and anyone else who wanted to venture out to a larger market.

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WGN broadcaster John Williams knows two things for sure; Coffee’s for closers, and someone out there has eaten the entire left side of a menu at a restaurant.

“There are movies that enable male bonding,” Williams said. “In Glengarry Glen Ross, it’s bonding in terror. In Diner, the bond is about growing up with friendships.” (You can correlate each of the opening intentions with the movies above.)

Williams said he believes these types of bonding opportunities make us better as human beings. “My dad was in the Air Force, and we predictably moved around quite a bit,” he said. “I always envied my friends who had a steady upbringing, who were able to feel the consistent ground under their feet. They’d known each other for years, shared inside jokes together.”

A 10-year-old John Williams found himself in fourth grade in Honolulu. “Once again, I was an outsider. We lived in Taiwan before that. Most of the kids were Japanese or Hawaiian, and I was one of the ‘haole,’ or white kids. I never had to spell the word, I just was the word.”

Williams was in second grade at the public school in Ewa Beach as one of two white kids in his class. “The racial difference wasn’t a factor but the fact that I was an outsider was.” He transferred to a Catholic School and, over the next three years, made friends and gained some confidence. Like most any of us, he just wanted to be accepted.

“I was a mild, meek kind of kid who never really got his bearing. I read a lot and was always curious enough. I asked the right questions. I’ve always been interested in everything. I wasn’t a recreational reader then.”

When he was young, Williams said comedians helped shape his thought processes. “I grew up with comics and their albums. We memorized the bits from George Carlin; later, it was Richard Pryor, Steve Martin. They were insane. Before his reprehensible behavior was realized, Bill Cosby influenced a lot of comics.” Cosby taught a lot of us how to tell a story.”

Throughout his childhood, Williams said he always thought he’d be a writer. “Becoming a broadcaster was so presumptuous to me. When you wrote, you didn’t have a microphone in your face at a radio station. Who was I to think I could pull that off.”

He kept busy writing short stories, poems, always typing away at something. “One year, I got a typewriter for my birthday. A Corona. I even had the click-out eraser cartridge, the whiteout. I still have a lot of that stuff around. But I always could find a sheet of paper, right?”

Hhmmm…a nerd and a hoarder. 

He attended Joliet junior college and earned what he said was an ‘associates degree in nothing,’ leaving him unqualified to do anything. In defense of junior colleges, Williams also said he felt an associates degree can, in fact get you ready to do anything well. “It was excellent,” he said. “It primed me to talk about anything.”

“After that, I went to Southern University of Illinois in Carbondale. They had a good broadcasting school. I tried getting into Northwestern, but that didn’t happen. I transferred to SIU as a junior. I couldn’t partake in any real broadcasting classes until my senior year. Couldn’t get in front of a microphone until then.”

His ambition was to be able to get into broadcasting in any form, at any level. “During my senior year, I was so nervous. I couldn’t hold a piece of paper without shaking,” Williams said. “I’d have to put the paper down on the counter in front of the microphone so it wouldn’t shake, and I could read the copy.”

Sending out tapes every six months was a part-time job for Williams and anyone else who wanted to venture out to a larger market. “This was in the late 80s,” Williams said. “I’d enjoyed a good career at WMBD in Peoria from 1982-1992 but looked for more. I was doing well in the mornings.”

Demo tapes went to cities like Cincinnati, Des Moines, Minneapolis, and all the mid-major markets. All the ads read, No Phone Calls. In attempts to get around this roadblock, Williams felt he was kind of slick.

“I’d call and say, “Hey, I’m not calling about my tape; I just wanted to see if you got it.” You never knew how that would play out. More tapes went to Orlando and Miami, Florida.

“I called and did my ‘follow-up’ and was put through to the program director at WIOD in Miami. I couldn’t believe it. I got through. The voice on the other end asked, ‘Are you John?’ He knew my name! I answered a feeble ‘yes.’ ‘John,’ the program director continued, ‘Apparently you can’t read because the ad said, NO CALLS!’”

After swallowing a trough of pride, a big break was getting from Peoria, which was 188th in the market at the time, to Minneapolis, which was 15th. The salvation manifested in the form of WCCO. He worked there from 1993-1997. “To go from 188-15 was a leap in every sense of the word,” Williams said.

Then, a really big break. After the usual barrage of outbound tapes, he got a call from WGN and was told he was on their short-list. He couldn’t believe it. “To go from 15th market to number three was beyond my imagination. The place where Wally Phillips, Bob Collins worked was like hallowed ground.”

Williams arrived at WGN Radio in September 1997 as a midday host. 

Planning out a show can be like walking a tightrope. “I don’t see the upside of talking too much about push-button and red meat topics. WGN is not a silo-broadcasting company. Other stations take a narrow approach and then preach to that choir. They are safe in that silo. But we’re a big tent station. We want to accommodate as many people as we can. You can get your tough talk politics elsewhere. There’s no point in running listeners off when they disagree with you. And frankly, those who would agree with you are exhausted with politics right now, so we don’t really need to go there. At least not much.”

How does Williams approach his day? He said he gets up in the morning, does his ‘clicking’ for news. “I go to NewsNation, Fox News, The New York Times. I buckle down. If I don’t, my show suffers.” He has a whiteboard in his office, and he breaks it all down, breaks it into half hours. 

“I go for a mix on my show,” Williams said. “I don’t do all interviews. I don’t want to do all open lines. I better have some breathing area, a chance to get the lay of the land.” Williams says it’s all about relatability, not an overdose of what Putin’s strategies might be.

“I had a great interview recently. I spoke with Kyle Buchanan, who wrote Blood, Sweat & Chrome, The Wild and True Story of Mad Max: Fury Road. We talked about director George Miller and other things.”

After 41 years in the business, Williams feels he’s hit his stride. “I was miscast a couple of times,” he said. “There were times I didn’t feel I was doing well. I don’t worry about my longevity too much now, but you do think about it. My motto was and is to stay in the game. Be versatile. You say you need someone to cover Chinese hockey? Where do I go to learn Mandarin?”

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BNM Writers

Everyone is Welcome at Keven Cohen’s Table

“For the first eight months, The Point was hemorrhaging money,” Cohen explained. “Bleeding would be too tame of a word.”

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Somebody had better step up and take the blame.

Ostensibly, both his mother and father are responsible for the odd spelling of Keven Cohen’s first name—probably more his mother.

“I think she had too much of the epidural medicine,” Keven Cohen jokes.

He likes the uniqueness but said it has caused its share of problems.

Cohen was born in Detroit, but the family moved to Florida just before his 13th birthday. He later studied broadcast journalism at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Where a lot of kids wanted to be a ballplayer, Cohen wanted to be Ernie Harwell, the legendary broadcaster for the Detroit Tigers.

“In our neighborhood, we didn’t ask when the Tigers played; we asked when Ernie was on.” That’s how revered the man was in Detroit. “To this day, I’m an obsessive Detroit fan. I like to say you can take Keven out of Detroit, but you can’t take Detroit out of Keven.”

Growing up, Cohen said he was inseparable from his older brother Marc. “We have been best friends since the day I was born,” Cohen said. Cohen was able to convince his mother and brother to move to Columbia so they could be around each other.

His sister was the lone holdout, but Cohen does speak to her every day, as a rule. Marc was a teacher but hung that up for corned beef, opening his Groucho’s Deli. His sister is a physical therapist. They’re like peas and carrots…and more peas.

Cohen started out in radio at WRUF in Gainesville. He spent five years at that station.

“After graduating college, they created a position for me as assistant sports director,” Cohen explained. “They were grooming me to take over for the sports director. The problem was that I realized that the sports director wasn’t going anywhere soon.”

In 1994, Cohen began searching for a new opportunity, but he still didn’t want to go too far from Gainesville. He’s truly a man dedicated to his family.

“My father died in a car accident when I was young, and I couldn’t bear the thought of moving too far from my mother in Florida,” Cohen said.

After enjoyable years at WRUF, Cohen began exploring new opportunities. He recalls landing his first dream job in Columbia, South Carolina. He knew he was as talented as the other 267 applicants for the sports job, but he had something else. Moxie.

“The guy that hired me in Columbia now does the radio play-by-play for the Atlanta Braves. Jim Powell,” Cohen said.

Cohen knew the competition would be tough, but he had his sights set firmly on the job. Interestingly, when many young radio people send out tapes, they send them everywhere around the country. This wasn’t the case for Cohen. Family is so important to him; he again didn’t want to go too far from home. The only tape he sent out was to Columbia. The distance between cities was doable.

“I called Jim Powell and pleaded with him to give me fifteen minutes with him,” Cohen said. “I told him I’d gladly drive the nearly six hours to Columbia, meet with him, then turn around and drive back to Gainesville. That’s how serious I was about the job.”

Powell was impressed with the young man’s spirit, and they talked for more than an hour and a half. A week and a half later, Powell called Cohen. Powell told Cohen there were candidates for the job with better demo tapes, but he liked Cohen’s tenacity and drive.

“I’ve got some good news and some bad news,” Powell told Cohen. The bad news was the station wouldn’t pay moving expenses. The good news was he had the job if he wanted it.

“When Jim Powell speaks to colleges and high school students, he still uses my tenacity as an example,” Cohen said.

After 18 years in a community, Cohen had developed some deep roots and friendships.

He was at WVOC in Columbia from 1994 until 2012, a good run in any radio market. Then management decided to go in a different direction and fired Cohen. This happened ten years ago, but you can still hear the pain in the recollection.

“I was devastated,” Cohen said. “I’d cut my chops on the radio there. I put in more than 18 years there. I was blindsided.” At the time of his firing, Cohen was hosting pre-game shows for the South Carolina Gamecocks, and it was the middle of the season. An election was just a short time away. Management figured that would be the perfect time to give him the ax.

For the ace-kicker, hours before his firing, Cohen had lunch with one of the salesmen and returned with a $64,000 sales package from a local business. They still fired him.

Isn’t that a fine how-do-you-do?

“My firing made the front page of The State newspaper,” Cohen explained. “There were protestors outside the building, upset that I’d been fired. Personally, I never felt any bitterness toward Clear Channel—publicly or privately for the firing.”

As they said in The Godfather, It was just business. Most people reading this are well aware of that sting. People in this business get stung so often that they don’t even bother putting baking soda on wounds.

WVOC gave him the talk all fired people know too well. They put him on the sidelines with a non-compete clause.

“I told them to keep their severance package; I just wanted to work.”

No dice. WVOC said that wasn’t going to happen.

“I’m the kind of guy who turned the firing into motivation,” Cohen said.

Cohen was offered a job in Jacksonville, Florida, but wanted to wait. He was promised a job by another station in Columbia when the non-compete expired.

“The call never came,” Cohen said. “I was so discouraged as I’d turned down the Jacksonville job. There were no other talk stations in Columbia. I either had to leave Columbia or leave radio.”

There were plenty of opportunities Cohen could have grabbed that required a briefcase. Banking or insurance companies would have begged to get him. He had earned a stellar reputation in the community, and many businesses felt he’d be good for their business if he worked for them.

Now it gets a little weird.

One night, Cohen couldn’t sleep, so he went down to the basement. He was able to fall asleep and was visited in a dream by a friend who’d died from cancer.

“In the dream, Rick told me everything was going to be alright, and I should start my own radio station.”

Thanks, Rick. Not like that’s a tall order or anything.

“It hit me that starting my own radio station was something I could and should do,” Cohen said. “I ran up to tell my wife about the dream and asked if she’d support me if I attempted to create my own station. She said if I let her go back to sleep, she’d support me.”

What a gal.

“I’d never considered this before,” Cohen said. “The only thing I’d ever done on radio was my show. I reached out to some people to get the ball rolling.”

Cohen said four banks were no help. “They knew me well and loved me, but realized I’d never run a radio station before, or anything even close to that. I don’t blame them.”

The dream (the one with Rick) paid dividends. Cohen was fired from WVOC in November 2012 and started his radio station in October 2013, less than a year later.

“For the first eight months, The Point was hemorrhaging money,” Cohen explained. “Bleeding would be too tame of a word.”

He said advertisers were initially wary, and he understood that as well. But they started to come around.

“Things were very lean at first,” Cohen said, “but when we hit the 10 ½ month mark, we broke even for the first time. Then, we started making money. Not a ton, but it was coming in.”

The Point, 100.7. FM, 1470 AM, has become a player in the market. “The community has been so supportive,” Cohen said.

The Point has evolved in its format. “I wanted an old-school talk radio station,” Cohen said. “I always wanted it to be community-driven. I’ve never pressured my hosts or news people to lean a certain way, politically or otherwise. They are on their own, as long as it’s ethical and moral.”

Cohen doesn’t like to micromanage. “I do all the traffic, schedule all the commercials, create all the sales. I’ve tried to create a family. We socialize together; I go out to lunch with hosts. They feel like they can talk with me about anything.”

On his morning show, Cohen doesn’t utilize a call screener; he just answers them as they come in. “There’s no way of picking and choosing which so many hosts like to do. Everyone is welcome at our table,” he said.

Which to me sounds a lot like, ‘We’ll leave the light on.’

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BNM Writers

The Biggest Story in America According to Bill O’Reilly

According to O’Reilly, the biggest development in the country in recent weeks is the disastrous situation at our nation’s southern border.

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Bill O’Reilly says the biggest story in America this month is mainly under-reported by politicians and the media. And its impact may extend much further than we can currently comprehend.

It’s not a Hollywood trial, exploding gas prices, economic pain, or a potential Supreme Court ruling.

According to O’Reilly, the biggest development in the country in recent weeks is the disastrous situation at our nation’s southern border. He joined the Glenn Beck Radio Program on Friday morning to discuss the country’s ongoing disaster and predicted that it will become the impetus for major developments in the next six to twelve months.

“Three million foreign nationals are estimated to cross just into Texas this year, this fiscal year,” O’Reilly began, chronicling the emerging siege of Texas’ border. “And a President doesn’t call the Governor of the state that has to deal with that one time? So everybody listening just says, oh, he’s just incompetent. It’s not that. And I keep telling everybody this, and few believe me. I think you do, Beck, but I’m not sure. The President of the United States does not know what he is doing. He is incapable of assimilating – word of the day – information. You can tell him something, and he’ll look at you, and maybe he’ll understand what you’re saying. But two minutes later, he will forget it.”

O’Reilly told Beck there are actual, devastating consequences for citizens when the President cannot seem to effectively react to or deal with this ballooning crisis.

“So Biden, who has not been to the border, another unbelievable occurrence, because if you add up the human toll of this, plus the narcotics traffic that’s killing hundreds of thousands of Americans every year, you add it up, this is a catastrophe,” O’Reilly said.

“I don’t believe the Constitution is a death pact. You know, it’s not a suicide pact.” Beck replied. “This is an invasion, and the government is doing nothing, and the government has the constitutional responsibility for the border, not the states. So that’s what’s kept the states out of it. But again, are we in a constitutional suicide pact?”

Responding to Beck, O’Reilly predicted that American citizens themselves are poised to react decisively.

“You elect a President; he comes into office. Americans have this idealistic view of that. Many times you elect someone who is destructive to the country. Alright, I mean many times. Not a few. Many. So what happens now?” O’Reilly asked rhetorically. “Well, everybody can whine and complain and talk about it, but what happens is this. In November, there is a course correction possible, whereby the American people would say, I recognize what a disaster Joe Biden is, and I’m sorry he’s the President. And if I voted for him, I made a mistake. So now I’m going to correct that mistake, and I’m going to give Congress the authority to deal with Biden. That’s our system. That’s how the Founders set it up.”

O’Reilly believes that this issue, among so many others going dreadfully wrong in America, such as punitive gas prices and unnecessary economic hardship, will galvanize voters to fight back in November.

“I fully expect that the Republicans will take both houses of Congress. I’ll be shocked if that doesn’t happen. Because of inflation, primarily, and the economy. That’s the driver of the vote. But second is the border,” O’Reilly predicted. “Now, once the Republicans take over, I can assure you articles of impeachment will be drawn up in January and February 2023 against Biden, on this issue. Dereliction of duty.”

And while the country endured the Democrat-fueled impeachment of our 45th president, O’Reilly thinks this time will be different. This time, he says, will be based on substance.

“He’s the commander in chief. This is dereliction of duty. Just like a corporal or a sergeant, if they were in the field with the military unit and they didn’t follow orders, that’s dereliction of duty. This is dereliction of duty,” O’Reilly said.

“Does everybody get this? Biden’s President, but he’s also the commander in chief of the armed forces. So you can impeach on those grounds. Now, will he be convicted in the Senate? Probably not. But it’ll be such a hammer blow to the country. The Trump impeachments were jokes. Everybody knew what that was. A setup by Pelosi on any grounds at all to embarrass Trump. This is much more serious because the numbers are there. The deaths are there. Verifiable. Not a phone call to Zelensky in Ukraine. This is people dying every day because their government will not stop the importation of deadly narcotics from Mexico. That’s what this is, and that is why this is the story of the week.”

Time will tell if Bill O’Reilly’s prognostication proves true and whether the lack of border security will continue to mushroom as a focal issue for voters.

If he is correct, what we are seeing in May will become an even bigger catalyst in January.

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