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Kevin Kietzman Examines Deal Done by Chiefs, Car Crash Victim’s Family

Five-year-old Ariel Young was injured when Britt Reid, son of head coach Andy Reid, smashed into her family’s car.

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newsletter and podcast from award-winning journalist Kevin Kietzman examine the motives behind a recent deal struck between the Kansas City Chiefs and the family of a baby who was injured in a vehicle collision involving one of its former coaches. 

Five-year-old Ariel Young was injured when Britt Reid, son of head coach Andy Reid, smashed into her family’s car. Reid later told police that he had 2-3 drinks and used Adderall that same day. 

Under the terms of the deal, the team has reportedly agreed to cover all of the girl’s medical bills and provide long-term financial compensation. 

“Would your former employer ever do this for you?” Kietzman asked. “Why did the Chiefs release the information on a Friday afternoon when nobody was looking and why did they release the information just one day after owner Clark Hunt had his only once per season news conference?” 

Kietzman criticized the media for not asking questions and accused the team of striking the deal to cover Andy Reid and team President Mark Donovan individually. 

“You see, these guys won a Super Bowl and didn’t call the NFL commissioner dirty names in private emails,” said Kietzman. “No, they almost certainly broke about a million NFL and team rules and regulations and threw a rager for the coaches prior to the Super Bowl as a perk.” 

Kietzman added that the NFL considers words more detrimental to the league’s image than actions.  

“Patriots’ owner Robert Kraft gets popped in Florida at a massage parlor, prostitution ring,” he added. “No biggie, it just goes away.  It’s not like he wrote an email to somebody that the NFL has lost its mind catering to the woke culture America is now rejecting at every turn.”

In 2019, Keitzman was let go from Sports Radio 810 WHB after critical comments he made on-air about Britt Reid. 

News Print & Digital

CBS News Announces New Team to Lead Streaming Plans

CBS News is in the streaming platform game, and it has announced a new team consisting of Anthony Galloway, Kaci Sokoloff, and David Reiter.

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Like all news networks, CBS News is in the streaming platform game. The news network has announced that The Wall Street Journal’s Anthony Galloway will oversee day-to-day programming and production as the senior vice president of CBS News Streaming. 

In addition to Galloway, CBS News brings in Kaci Sokoloff as vice president of bookings for CBS News Network and Streaming and David Reiter as executive producer of CBS News special events across Network and Streaming.

“As we unify our organization, we’re delighted to bring together a team who will accelerate our streaming ambitions,” Neeraj Khemlani, president and co-head of CBS News and Stations, said. 

“Anthony, Kaci and David will bolster our coverage of top news events on every platform and help us achieve a vision of a truly multiplatform, global news division.”

Galloway joins CBS News from The Wall Street Journal. He most recently held the newsroom role of the chief content officer, editorial video, audio, and voice programming titles with the newspaper.

Sokoloff is a promotion from within CBS News as he will now lead a centralized Network bookings unit surrounding CBS News’ broadcast and streaming platforms. 

Reiter is another promotion from within as he’s spent the last 20 years at ABC News serving as a journalist and news executive. He will oversee breaking news and significant global event coverage, including the upcoming State of the Union, CBS News’ midterm elections, and election night, across traditional linear and digital platforms.

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News Print & Digital

Op-Ed by The Salt Lake Tribune Incites Controversy

The newspaper called for the National Guard to keep unvaccinated people confined to their homes.

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Kim Raff for The New York Times

Pundits of vaccine mandates are questioning an op-ed by The Salt Lake Tribune that called for the National Guard to keep unvaccinated people confined to their homes.

The article said the best tool for fighting the virus is the current vaccines approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“That fluttering noise you hear coming from the direction of the Capitol building is the sound of the state of Utah waving the white flag of surrender in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic,” the Tribune’s editors wrote.

Congressman Chip Roy (R-TX) reacted with outrage to the op-ed.

“The Salt Lake City Tribune editorial board – while masquerading as journalists – call on the military to target their own neighbors,” Roy tweeted. “Remember – these people want to come after you.”

Utah has the fourth-highest number of new COVID-19 cases of any state, and the Omicron variant’s prevalence has forced some students to return to remote learning.

“Gov. Spencer Cox and the new state epidemiologist, Dr. Leisha Nolen, let it officially be known Friday morning that there are so few tests available in the state, and so many people who reasonably fear that they have contracted the coronavirus, that anyone who is feeling the kind of symptoms associated with the disease should just assume they are infected and stay home,” the editorial added. 

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News Print & Digital

Company That Rates News Reliability Ready to Make Profit

In 2021, NewsGuard more than doubled its revenue in 2021 versus the year due to the licensing agreements with advertisers and other companies that use its ratings.

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NewsGuard, a four-year-old startup company that checks the web and rates the reliability of the information provided sources, states it’s trustworthy enough to turn a profit, per CNN.

In 2021, NewsGuard more than doubled its revenue in 2021 versus the year due to the licensing agreements with advertisers and other companies that use its ratings.

“To the degree that we can empower people with more information about which sources are trustworthy and to the degree that we can help advertisers stop subsidizing misinformation on the internet, we think we can make a real contribution to the news environment and to increasing trust in sources that deserve trust,” co-CEO Gordon Crovitz said.

The company is now growing into new regions, such as rating individual television shows and new markets, including Canada. 

“We think it’s important that we did this as a for-profit business that can be viable, that doesn’t have to depend on, you know, the kindness of strangers,” co-CEO Steven Brill said. “My own view is that that’s the path that journalism needs to take — to figure out business models that work.”

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