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KSL Celebrates Its 100th Anniversary

In its history, KSL has achieved 52.5 million minutes on air, 50,000 watts, and 200,000 shows; as a result, the radio station has covered local and national news from the World Wars to Sept. 11th. 

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KSL Newsradio has hit the 100th-anniversary mark, and the Utah-based radio station is having many people reflect on their time. KSL is the oldest radio station west of the Mississippi River, so people understand the history it possesses when working there. 

“We are dependable, stable; we are like a big oak tree,” Amanda Dickson, co-host of KSL Newsradio’s morning show, said. 

“We have been there for so many people’s lives for generations. … It gives them a feeling of ground under their feet, like at least this doesn’t change. Everything else in the world changes, but at least this thing is still there.”

In its history, KSL has achieved 52.5 million minutes on air, 50,000 watts, and 200,000 shows; as a result, the radio station has covered local and national news from the World Wars to Sept. 11th. 

“Oh, it’s amazing. It truly is,” Doug Wright, Utah’s longtime midday radio voice, said. 

“There are very few radio stations anywhere in the country or even the world that can claim that kind of a legacy under basically the same ownership with the same mission and in serving the same community. It really is quite remarkable.”

KSL created a “Happy 100th KSL Newsradio” video featuring thank yous and shoutouts from entertainers, celebrities, politicians, and other well-known names in Utah as part of the celebration for the radio station.

Here’s the list of people in the video: 

  • Entertainers Donny, Marie and Merrill Osmond
  • University of Utah head football coach Kyle Whittingham and former receiver Britain Covey
  • BYU head football coach Kalani Sitake
  • Jon Schmidt of The Piano Guys
  • Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah
  • Singer Alex Boye
  • Filmmaker Jared Hess
  • Composer and musician Kurt Bestor
  • Gail Miller, businesswoman.
  • Utah Gov. Spencer Cox
  • Former Utah Gov. Gary Herbert
  • Derek Miller, president and CEO of Salt Lake Chamber and Downtown Alliance
  • John Kimball, president of Real Salt Lake
  • Erin Mendenhall, mayor of Salt Lake City

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The Bumper Song for Rush Limbaugh Will Be Retired

Clay Travis and Buck Sexton told their audience Thursday that the rights to Rush’s iconic bumper music “My City was Gone” are set to expire.

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It’s official. The final piece of Rush Limbaugh on syndicated radio will be retired soon. Clay Travis and Buck Sexton told their audience Thursday that the rights to Rush’s iconic bumper music “My City was Gone” are set to expire. 

Limbaugh popularized the song performed by The Pretenders using it as a bumper song which then became synonymous with his overall brand. 

“For decades, Rush’s theme song has reminded everyone about their truth and clarity are on the way,” Travis said. “It’s an iconic song forever that’s going to be attached to Rush Limbaugh and everything that he represented.”

With the one-year anniversary of the “Clay Travis & Buck Sexton Show” approaching, the duo spent time reflecting on the show’s inception and the indelible mark that Limbaugh left on millions of Americans.  

“And for us, this is really like retiring the jersey in sports,” said Sexton. “Because Rush’s theme song is forever attached to his memory, everything he built, and we deeply honor that, his legacy. And that song is a part of his legacy, of course.” 

Clay & Buck’s new theme song is “My Own Worst Enemy.”

“These guys moved to Tennessee from California because they were so frustrated with the direction that California politics had gone (laughing), and they are going to be longtime listeners of this show,” Travis said.  

“They loved Rush. And when we had this conversation with them, Buck, I mean you should have seen their faces and how excited they were to be able to bring their music to this audience and connect their brand and their spirit with the spirit and brand of the greatest radio show audience that has ever existed in American history,” he added. 

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WOLB’s Larry Young Recovering After Having His Leg Amputated

WOLB’s Larry Young has been off the air since April 10.

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A popular Baltimore radio host is recovering after having his leg amputated due to an allergy triggered by his Type 2 diabetes. According to the Baltimore Sun, WOLB’s Larry Young has been off the air since April 10.

“I knew I had a problem,” Young told the paper. “I didn’t know it was as severe as it was. When I got to the hospital, the doctors gave me two options: amputation or death. That is a terrible thing to hear.”

Young has been hosting the morning show on the Urban One-owned station for nearly three decades. He reportedly is planning to retire at the end of the year. 

“Larry is a wonderful person, and we all miss him terribly,” said WOLB GM Howard Mazer. “I’m sure all of our listeners are looking forward to his return.”

Young is no stranger to health scares. 18 years ago, he was rushed to the hospital after suffering a heart episode. Young said at the time, doctors gave him less than a 1% chance of surviving. 

“The word ‘no’ is not in Larry’s vocabulary,” Mazer said. “He will go out of his way to help someone, no matter what.

Former mayor Catherine Pugh will fill-in during Young’s absence. 

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NPR Inks Three-Year Partnership with Take 1

Under the agreement, which started in January 2022, Take 1 is delivering NPR with exact, XML-based transcriptions for over 30 daily and weekly programs and limited series.

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NPR has announced a new partnership as the radio company reached a three deal with Take 1 which will transcribe its news, analysis, and podcast programming. 

Under the agreement, which started in January 2022, Take 1 is delivering NPR with exact, XML-based transcriptions for over 30 daily and weekly programs and limited series. Furthermore, the company will provide the stats with turnaround times varying from a few days to just a few hours.

“Almost all of my searches for transcribers show most U.S. providers cannot handle NPR’s high volume, high accuracy, and rush deadlines at an affordable price, and competitive businesses based abroad are unfamiliar with the intricacies of American-English accents, slang, idioms, and cultural references,” Laura Soto-Barra, NPR RAD chief (Research Archives & Data Strategy) said. 

“NPR poses an added challenge due to the many specialized subjects we cover, from world politics to science and medicine. Still additionally, the tech requirements and the format that allows the transcript to be ingested in the NPR systems present additional challenges not all companies can resolve. We’ve known the Take 1 team for many years, we’ve used their translation services in the past, and they were one of the very few I knew that could deliver against this brief.”

The multipurpose core of NPR’s transcripts signifies that accuracy and fast turnarounds are equally crucial to the company. In addition to being dispersed to NPR’s network of member stations, the transcriptions that Take 1 constructs are posted on the NPR website to make the content available.

“Almost all of my searches for transcribers show most U.S. providers cannot handle NPR’s high volume, high accuracy, and rush deadlines at an affordable price, and competitive businesses based abroad are unfamiliar with the intricacies of American-English accents, slang, idioms, and cultural references,” says Laura Soto-Barra, NPR RAD chief (Research Archives & Data Strategy). 

“NPR poses an added challenge due to the many specialized subjects we cover, from world politics to science and medicine. Still additionally, the tech requirements and the format that allows the transcript to be ingested in the NPR systems present additional challenges not all companies can resolve.” She continues, “We’ve known the Take 1 team for many years, we’ve used their translation services in the past, and they were one of the very few I knew that could deliver against this brief.”

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